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WFF information please


#1

This may seem off-topic, but I am aware that there is a considerable cross-pollination of enthusiasts between SOTA and WFF. It therefore seems appropriate to ask a couple of questions here, in an attempt to utilise the undoubted expertise available within the ranks of SOTA enthusiasts.

I sincerely hope that this thread will not be used to cast aspersions upon the motivation, integrity or competence of those who run the WFF programme. Whatever some may think, it is clearly a very popular activity, generating huge pile-ups across the bands. To me, that is its attraction. I have no real interest in collecting areas, but find that quoting a WFF reference is a sure-fire way to generate a large number of QSOs in a short space of time. So, whether I want to increase my DXCC count from another country, or merely test a new antenna just down the road, it provides a useful service.

So, to the questions! It seems that the accepted practice is to send an activation log to the national WFF manager, who then forwards it to somebody else for action. Can anybody explain why this convoluted procedure is necessary? Also, why is there such a time-lapse between the manager forwarding it and its eventual appearance in the WFF database?

I have found the useful WFF log-search facility at http://ew4dx.org/WFFsearch.html which keeps track of my “chases”, but can find no simple way of checking which of my activator logs has been uploaded to the main WFF database. Can anybody explain how to do this please?

Over to you experts …

73 de Les, G3VQO


#2

Somewhere on the WFF site I once found what appeared to be a facility to upload your QSOs. But when I enquired further I was told that it wasn’t up and running yet, so logs still had to be submitted via M0OXO. It is quite difficult to navigate the WFF website to find the answers to any particular questions.

I haven’t submitted an updated WFF log for several months; I may or may not get around to it soon.

Overall, I have looked at the main and G WFF websites, and in answer to your questions Les - I haven’t got a clue!

Tom M1EYP


#3

In reply to G3VQO:

As Charles M0OXO is the England WFF manager, I would suggest asking him, his details are on qrz.com.


#4

In reply to G3VQO:

So, to the questions! It seems that the accepted practice is to send
an activation log to the national WFF manager, who then forwards it to
somebody else for action. Can anybody explain why this convoluted
procedure is necessary? Also, why is there such a time-lapse between
the manager forwarding it and its eventual appearance in the WFF
database?

I always send my WFF logs directly to elog at wff44.org. Some country managers seem to have a policy of approving each activation - when I submitted a log of vacation activation of 9AFF-003, it was forwarded to the manager, who asked me for some photos from the activation and then confirmed to Igor EW4DX that the activity was ok. The logs are usually loaded to WFF Search db within few days.


#5

In reply to G3VQO:
Hi Les,

Here in France, our WFF manager wishes to receive our logs; so he validates the expedition with photos, videos, and often he wishes a little report to be published on the french website. But I don’t know how long it takes to be in the WFF database
Some months ago, I sent my home log to EW4DX (my QTH is in FFF-045). Now, I don’t play the game anymore from home; only from SOTA summits when they are located in an WFF area.

73 Alain F6ENO


#6

In reply to G3VQO:

I am “Dutch Representative”, what ever that means…
However I have to find out everything my self.

I make use of it, it is an easy way to have some pile-up fun when you are not near summits. ( the 2km summit is not here yet ).
The pile-up is amasing. Never worked any any interesting DXCC, it is all the usual chasers, like in SOTA.
In the meantime I see some parts of PA, that I never visited before and have a nice walk with the XYL.

All activations are legal, in a house , car etc. I asked for PAFF-nr for the location of our clubstation, that was also in a nature area. Sorry we do not have the location anymore. Otherwise I always work SOTA stile.

I collect the info from a few PA activators, approve it and send log to Igor, no problem.
He answers in a few days “it is uploaded”

A way of checking is looking in http://ew4dx.org/WFFsearch.html
Last uploads are in a list.
Also you can look in the list how much % activated the WFF.
Go to:
UPLOAD YOUR WFF LOG:
Login: wff
Password: view
send
search: example: PAFF-045
answer: PAFF-045 Horstermeerpolder 1,04%

0,00 = not activated , hi hi

So if it is higher than before, your upload is included.

Working with WFF, you realise that SOTA is much better organised.
Also it is easy to find the top of a summit, just follow the arrow on the GPS.
To find the location and the border of a wff area, is very difficult, and not much info aviable.

73 de Hans PA3FYG

PS: Hope to work you next week from DM/NW-xxx, DLFF-number as a bonus.


#7

In reply to M1EYP, OK1HAG, F6ENO and PA3FYG:

Many thanks for the information. It seems that you all use WFF purely as a QSO-generator, like I do, rather than as an award scheme in itself. If that view is typical, then it suggests that the WFF bubble may well burst sometime in the future, when people with no inherent attachment to the award get bored and move on. Meanwhile, let’s keep enjoying those pile-ups!

The information from Hans was particularly useful, although I have not yet grasped the exact meaning of the percentage value displayed. Never mind; my activations of FFF-043 and ONFF-022 have been uploaded, although my log for GFF-120 has still not made it.

My limited experience agrees with Hans that there is a “standard” group of chasers waiting to pounce on each activation. Luckily many of them are users of Logbook-of-the-World, so my DXCC credits can rise significantly after each non-English activation.

I have plans for further WFF activity from Wales, France and Belgium in the near future, so I’ll hope to hear many SOTA/WFF regulars in the pile-ups then.

73 de Les, G3VQO


#8

SOTA requires only one contact to count a summit as an activated unique, and just four to qualify for the summit points. It is therefore fascinating that many of us (but not all) enjoy recording large QSO totals from our SOTA activations. The extra QSOs count for nought in SOTA, so why do we do it?

Probably because we enjoy amateur radio - especially from a nice portable location in good weather. Personally, I like the pile-up practice on CW, but it seems I have a long way to go. I had a go at the FOC Pile-Up Challenge at the recent RSGB Convention and managed to correctly copy 11 callsigns from the recording. The FOC guys sat opposite me were filling their whole sheets before I could finish the first column!

Of course some of our finest at handling CW DX pile-ups are out at T32C at present (including the SOTA President and Founder John G3WGV), and seem to be receiving many compliments about their operating on cluster comments. I have now managed to hear them, but haven’t yet managed to work them! Anyone else had any joy?

Tom M1EYP


#9

In reply to M1EYP:

The extra QSOs count for nought in SOTA, so why do we do it?

Those first 4 QSOs are always the worry. Only after the fourth can I relax and fully enjoy the activation. It’s silly now that I have garnered some basic and rough CW skills, I don’t need to worry about making 4 QSOs. I do like to make as many as I can. But that’s more for the chasers benefit than mine. I may have carried a bag of radios and batteries some distance so I do want to get some use out of the gear for the sweat invested, but it only seems fair to me to try to work as many chasers as possible. Without the regular chasers, SOTA would be so different. Many of the summits I’m activating have low activation counts so will be unique to many, especially for chasers in Europe. And anyway, it’s nice to be the centre of the pileup rather than calling and calling to trying to break through.

In reply to G3VQO:

I’m glad to see you’ve got some answers Les. I had a look for the GMFF info the other day and it seems I’ve activated a few GMFF areas without knowing. If I’m feeling brave I may give the GMFF number next time I’m out.

Andy
MM0FMF


#10

In reply to MM0FMF:

If I’m feeling brave I may give the GMFF number next time I’m out…

Only do so on 14MHz CW if you are in good general health :wink:

QSO rates can typically be 90 per hour. Nothing I dare say for the average FOC / FSDXA chap, but plenty for me!

Tom M1EYP


#11

In reply to M1EYP:

I have now managed to hear them, but haven’t yet
managed to work them! Anyone else had any joy?

I cheated and worked T32C on SSB from the Cambridge University Wireless Society club shack. With an FT1000-MP, Quadra linear and StepIR beam in an RF-quiet location they are pretty easy to work.

One of our visitors got them very easily on CW - they were very strong - didn’t need the headphones.

I’d like to work them from home but I think it would be a struggle.

Do keep trying though - they are very keen to work as many UK stations as possible.


#12

In reply to M1MAJ:

managed to work them! Anyone else had any joy?

I could hear them on 10m cw last night on my vertical just after 6 pm, the pileup was massive.


#13

Have managed to work them on 10 & 15 mtrs USB.Keep listening for other bands. Don G0RQL.


#14

In reply to M1EYP:

I have worked T32C on 30m and 40m CW. I only have wire dipoles at 30 ft agl.

73,
Walt (G3NYY)


#15

In reply to G3VQO:

WFF is a collection of well-run National programs, grouped into a less-well run Global one. As others have said, Charles M0OXO is quite approachable.

The delay in logs being uploaded is largely down to the fact that Igor (EW4DX, also a good egg) is the bottleneck.

I’d commend any activator to cite a WFF reference is applicable, and submit logs - after all, many SOTA chasers are also WFF chasers (likewise for activators)

But again as others have said, be ready when you call WFF as the interest is quite astounding, and a rate of 60+ QSOs/hour on SSB is quite standard…

Andrew
M6ADB