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SOTA News June 2017


#1

SOTA NEWS JUNE 2017 - Part 1 of 2

Editorial - by Mark G0VOF
Welcome to the June 2017 edition of SOTA News. My thanks go to the following contributors:- Barry GM4TOE, Skip K6DGW, Roy G4SSH, Kevin G0NUP, Rob and Audrey G4RQJ, Warren ZL2AJ, Toru JH0CJH, Luc ON7DQ, Paulo CT2IWW, Gerald G4OIG, Jörg DL3LUM, Colwyn MM0YCJ, Paul DL6FBK.

73, Mark G0VOF

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The May 2017 edition of SOTA News was viewed more than 1100 times.

SOTA AWARDS May 2017 from Barry GM4TOE - SOTA Awards Manager.

Demand for certificates continues unabated and the numbers ordered this month look likely to become normal. Congratulations are due to Don, G0RQL, who has now exceeded 100k Chaser points, I doubt there is an Activator whose log does not feature Don somewhere. We have a new Mountain Goat in HB9FVF and Shack Sloths K7HLN and K3TCU; once again, congratulations.

Behind Don, but not that far behind, is Gary W0MNA on 75k points and four new “Supersloths” DD5LP, N7WM, W6JMP and M3FEH

Trophies Issued

Mountain Goat
HB9FVF Matthias Senn

Shack Sloth
K7HLN Robert L. Solomon
K3TCU Gary Kulling

Certificates Issued

Activator
VK3PF Peter Freeman 2500 points
M0JCQ James Stevens 500 points
DL4TO Gerhard Sedlak 500 points
VK3IL David Giddy 500 points
GW8NZN David F. Roberts 250 points
DF9GU Bernd Kohler 100 points
SQ8JMZ Robert Szura 100 points

Chaser
G0RQL Don Roomes 100000 points
W0MNA Gary Auchard 75000 points
DD5LP Ed Durrant 10000 points
N7WM Wendell Morrill 10000 points
W6JMP Gene Trasti 10000 points
M3FEH Karl Kruger 10000 points
M3ZCB Caroline Blackmun 5000 points
VK3ZPF Peter Fraser 2500 points
GI0AZA Esther Harper 2500 points
GI0AZB Ian Evans 2500 points
WC9G Ron Burns 2500 points
GI0AZB Ian Evans 1500 points
K7HLN Robert L. Solomon 1000 points
VK5PL David Poole 1000 points
M3FEH Karl Kruger 1000 points
SQ8JMZ Robert Szura 1000 points
K5QR Andrew Bonnot 1000 points
SP6NVB Bogdan Morawski 500 points
VE2GT Pierre Jolin 500 points
K5QR Andrew Bonnot 500 points
W2SE Bruce Babcock 500 points
VE2GT Pierre Jolin 250 points
YO8SSB Damian Lucian 250 points
ZL3JD Phil van Kuilenburg 100 points
W6SAE Steven Ewald 100 points
K5QR Andrew Bonnot 100 points
KN4BKS Elizabeth Burns 100 points
YO8SSB Damian Lucian 100 points

Activator Unique
VK2JDL Phil Clancy 100 summits

Chaser Unique
ON4FI Karel Naessens 6000 summits
M3FEH Karl Kruger 2000 summits
M3FEH Karl Kruger 1000 summits
GI0AZB Ian Evans 250 summits
GI0AZB Ian Evans 100 summits
VE2GT Pierre Jolin 100 summits
LZ2OQ Georgi Aleksov 100 summits

Summit to Summit
VK2IO Gerard Hill Platinum
VK3ZPF Peter Fraser Silver
M1MAJ Martyn Johnson Silver
M3ZCB Caroline Blackmun Silver
M1MAJ Martyn Johnson Bronze
M3ZCB Caroline Blackmun Bronze
GI0AZB Ian Evans Red
ND9Q Douglas Quamme Red
VK3IL David Giddy Red
WC9G Ron Burns Red
SQ8JMZ Robert Szura Red

Mountain Hunter
GI0AZB Ian Evans Platinum
GI0AZB Ian Evans Gold
M3FEH Karl Kruger Gold
GI0AZB Ian Evans Silver
M3FEH Karl Kruger Silver
VK3ZPF Peter Fraser Bronze
M3FEH Karl Kruger Bronze
YO8SSB Damian Lucian Bronze

SOTA Complete
VK3PF Peter Freeman 250 summits
VK2IO Gerard Hill 100 summits

Microwave Award
M0DDC Alan Copperwaite 50 km 23 cm

The increase in the number of certificate orders brings with it increased problems. There is a growing tendency to order a certificate without first checking your entry on the database, I have had certificates ordered for which the person involved has not qualified (e.g. Activator certificates where they have not made any Activations!) and, more commonly, inaccurate dates for the award qualification. I have to check every claim manually and it appears people are relying on me to do the checking for them. There are notable exceptions, where claimants are precise and I know I can process their claims with just a cursory check, the others take a very long time.

In future, I will reject claims which are inaccurate, have the wrong claim date, require me to process the log to verify the claim information (e.g. filter the log to find just CW when it contains a mix of modes) or where the database has not been used correctly – a classic example is failure to enter information in the format required (Microwave and Summit to Summit awards in particular). There is, in process, an update to the awards claim procedure which will enable your claim to be checked prior to submission; this is several months away from implementation so the responsibility to check the accuracy of your award claim is yours – not mine!

The volume of claims have resulted in problems with my email server where it just refuses to send the pdf files (or takes forever to do so). An interim solution has been put into place where the pdf of your certificate will be placed on a central server and I will send you a link (by email) so that you may download it. I will leave certificates on the server for about one week before removing them in order to keep the numbers at a manageable size; please download the file before it is removed.

Finally, I am on vacation with immediate effect until about 20 June. No orders will be processed between now and when I return so that means orders placed between 30 May and 20 June may not be shipped or otherwise processed until the end of June. There is absolutely no point chasing your order as I will not be checking my SOTA email server or the shopping site.

I plan to make a couple of activations from CT3 during the next two weeks and would be happy to work any SOTA participant (if you can put up with my poor CW!), probably 20m and 17m CW & SSB. Alerts will be posted on SOTAwatch

Stay safe on the hills

73

Barry GM4TOE
SOTA Awards Manager

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NORTH AMERICAN REPORT from Skip K6DGW

Hello again to all. May saw a wild mix of weather across the continent, but SOTA activity was fairly robust in spite of the thunderstorms, snow hanging around from the bumper snowfall year, and even tornadoes.

I finally decided I needed to rewrite the statistics summary program, and the first month’s results are below. This version includes some double-entry audit trails so I can verify the results, and capitalizes on the recent ARM updates which removed extraneous commas from some of the summit names. The Last Month values are all zero because I couldn’t run statistics for April. While I doubt we’ll see any activations on VLF or 24 GHz, I also never thought we’d see 433 MHz AM activations and we have, so we’ll leave all of them in for now. I don’t know what the two “Other” QSO’s were but that’s how they were logged to the SOTA Database… SSTV?

NA Statistics for May
Produced: 05/29/2017 at: 20:18:50 UTC

Total Activations: 639 [0]
Total Activators: 178 [0]
Total Chaser QSO’s: 5995 [0]
Total Chasers: 270 [0]
Unique Summits: 430 [0]

BAND # LAST MONTH
VLF: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
1.8MHZ: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
3.5MHz: 12 ( 0.2%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
5MHz: 95 ( 1.6%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
7MHz: 1243 ( 20.9%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
10MHz: 765 ( 12.9%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
14MHz: 3447 ( 58.1%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
18MHz: 125 ( 2.1%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
21MHz: 19 ( 0.3%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
28MHz: 9 ( 0.1%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
50MHz: 11 ( 0.1%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
70MHz: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
144MHz: 182 ( 3.0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
220MHz: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
433MHz: 13 ( 0.2%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
900MHz: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
1240MHz: 8 ( 0.1%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
2.3GHz: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
3.4GHz: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
5.6GHz: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
10GHz: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
24GHz: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
uwave: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]

MODE # LAST MONTH:
AM: 0 ( 0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
CW: 4287 ( 72.3%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
Data: 5 ( 0.0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
FM: 202 ( 3.4%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
Other: 2 ( 0.0%) [ 0 ( 0%)]
SSB: 1432 ( 24.1%) [ 0 ( 0%)]

AWARDS AND ACHIEVEMENTS: None claimed this month.

NEWS:

Wayne, N6KR, of Elecraft fame announced on the NA SOTA Group: “The latest KX2 firmware provides built-in logging capability in CW/PSK/RTTY modes, when using the internal keyer. This is really convenient if you’re operating the rig hand-held, or whenever you can’t stop to do logging.”

“The log stores up to 2048 characters in EEPROM, along with time stamps and band/mode data. Text can be reviewed in the rig itself or dumped to a terminal application, allowing you to transfer the contacts to a paper or PC log later. If you’d like to try this feature, send me an email (n6kr at elecraft dot com).”

Wayne [and his young son Griffen] are fairly ardent campers and hikers. This will likely end up in a firmware release soon if it hasn’t already.

HAPPENINGS OF INTEREST:

From Etienne, K7ATN: “A great article on all the SOTA fun to be had in Mount Rainier National Park by Darryl-WW7D and an invitation to all to join us in Seaside on Friday, June 2 for the annual SOTA Gathering. Here’s the latest Pacific Northwest SOTA Newsletter for May and June 2017:”

http://www.pnwsota.org/sites/pnwsota.org/files/downloads/K7ATN/PNW%20SOTA%20Newsletter%20May-June%202017.pdf_

Back issues: http://www.pnwsota.org/content/pacific-northwest-sota-newsletters http://www.pnwsota.org/content/pacific-northwest-sota-newsletters

Bob, K0NR, reports: “Announcing the 2017 Colorado 14er Event, now with 1805 SOTA summits”

“Amateur Radio operators from around Colorado will be climbing many of Colorado’s 14,000-foot mountains and Summits On The Air (SOTA) peaks to set up amateur radio stations in an effort to communicate with other radio amateurs across the state and around the world. Well, last year we celebrated the 25^th annual event so this year it must be the 26th. We are continuing the all weekend approach on August 5 and 6.”

More here: http://www.k0nr.com/wordpress/2017/05/08/colorado14er2017/
and here: http://www.ham14er.org

There was a discussion thread about all of the lingering snow in the Western mountains and high country which prompted a definition from Etienne, K7ATN:

whumpf [wuhh-UMp-fffn.] The noise made when the fracture of a lower snow layer causes an upper layer to fall or collapse making a whumpfing sound. An obvious sign of instability. For backcountry skiers, a whumpf is a sign not to go there.

REPORTS:

John, K1JD, and Fred, KT5X [aka WS0TA] sent a photo: “May 23rd on Barillas Peak in the Pecos Wilderness, New Mexico. TNX QSO’s folks! Appreciated! T’was uhhh, ‘chilly’.”

Barillas Peak

And our report of the Month comes from Brad, WA6MM, and is the source of the above definition: “I had a fun but tough first activation of Galena Mountain, W0C/SR-110, in Colorado last weekend.Galena Mtn is a 2.75 mile (5.5 m RT) climb with 2900 ft of elevation gain up to 12,893 ft. The road around Turquoise Lake was free of snow but the trail head parking lot was closed.I ended up parking at the entrance to the parking area, keeping my truck just off the main road.The snow was firm when I left the trail head at 7am and I didn’t yet need snowshoes. – I put those on after the first hour of climbing. There is still a lot of snow here and I underestimated how long it would take me to summit.”

Galena Mountain

“Part of the issue was trying to follow the Colorado Trail for the first 1.5 miles and 1300 ft of climbing through the snow filled forest.I saw no evidence of other hikers so I had to break trail. Following the trail markings on trees started out rather straightforward but got more difficult to follow higher up.I needed to navigate with my iPhone GPS app to help keep me close to the actual trail and most efficient path up the mountain.I only got temporarily /lost/ a few times ;-).This slowed down my progress until I got above the tree line and navigation became much easier.”

“I left the Colorado Trail at 11,300 ft and headed directly north towards Galena over continuous snowfields.I was startled many times hearing the infamous ‘whumpfs’ beneath me.There where no signs of surface cracks but it always gets my adrenaline going when I hear that sound! It appeared the recent snowfall had not bonded well to the deeper layers in this area.So, I decided to stay away from the steeper sections of these slopes and take a safer route.I was able to take my snowshoes off around 12,000 ft as I entered more mixed rock/snow terrain for the final push to the summit.”

“I finally reached the summit after over 3.75 hours of climbing.I was about an hour behind schedule.The weather was great with little wind and blue sky above me.The forecast called for showers after 12 noon and I could see the clouds in the distance.I set up my antenna and operating position just to the south of the summit proper.I was not able to spot myself via SotaGoat even though I had bars on my phone.In fact, I was able to call my XYL to let her know I summitted.Not sure what the problem was.In any event, since I posted an alert on Sotawatch I was confident I would get spotted via RBNhole.”

Operating position on Galena Mountain

“I started on 40M CW but the band seemed really dead.I gave up after several minutes and went to 20M CW.I quickly made 15 contacts.It was now 11:45am and the clouds were moving in around me – weather changes fast up high!It was time to pack up and descend.I was back to the trail head in under 2 hrs and it didn’t start raining until I was driving home.”

“Many thanks to all the chasers looking out for me!Until the next time …”

That’s it for this time, summer weather [well … warm springlike weather] has made it to NW Nevada. Time to charge the batteries with the solar panel.

73,

Fred (“Skip”) K6DGW
Sparks NV USA
Washoe County DM09dn
NA SOTA Reporter Dude

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First non-American KH6 SOTA Activation – Jörg KH6/DL3LUM

Hi all!

I just wanted to highlight to you that on 5th May 2017 I have activated KH6/OH-025 (Diamond Head) with 16 QSO’s (W’s, ZL, JA) on 20 mtr cw. According to the database it seems I am the first non American to have activated a KH6 SOTA.

vy 73 Jörg DL3LUM PA1MUC

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Second NA<>EU S2S Event- Gerald G4OIG

A total of 36 European summits and 18 North American summits were activated during a 4 hour period on Saturday 13th May 2017. Despite abysmal conditions with deep QSB and high QRN levels, several trans-Atlantic QSOs were made, including a number of summit to summit contacts.

Feedback indicates that most people enjoyed the event despite the conditions. The next event has already been planned for 18th November when it is hoped that radio conditions will be much better. These events provide an opportunity to experience a longer than normal stay on a summit which in itself adds to the challenge of activating.

73 for now,

Gerald G4OIG

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Creag Mhor (GM/NS-065) The final Scottish ‘Graham’ receives a first SOTA activation – Colwyn MM0YCJ

Creag Mhor (GM/NS-065), an anonymous and remote hill in the County of Sutherland was the only Scottish 4 point summit that had not been activated. This was successfully performed on Sunday 7th May 2017. Creag Mhor (big crag, big rock or big cliff) is the highest point of the range of remote hills to the southeast of the Munro Ben Klibreck. The range is usually known by the name of Creag Mhor’s lower neighbour, Ben Armine, which is also a Graham.

Graham, was the maiden name of the late Helen Torbet (Nee Graham) who provided the list of Scottish hills between 2000 feet and 2500 feet, separated by a drop of at least 150 metres. Corbetts are Scottish peaks from 2500 feet to 3000 feet first listed by John Rooke Corbett, a Scottish Mountaineering Club member. Our imperial past meant that the Corbett’s originally had a drop of 500 feet (152.4 metres). The current metric list uses the same 150 metre drop for classification as the Grahams. Most will know that those peaks above 3000 feet are the Scottish Munros. The final Munro to be activated was GM/WS-006, Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan (Rocky peak of the quarters - 1151m, 3776ft) on 22/04/2012. This was after I failed to activate it, despite broadcasting from the summit, two months earlier on 16/02/2012; missing the winter bonus but surviving to fight another day. The final Corbett activated was GM/NS-028, the remote Beinn a’ Chaisgein Mor (Large forbidding mountain, 857m, 2812ft) on 04/10/2015.

The points allocated to each peak are decided by each Association Reference Manual. The points are 10, 8, 6, 4, 2 and 1 points and the Scotland (GM) Association parameters are; Band 1, score 1 point for summits less than 500m above sea level (ASL). Band 2, scores 2 points, from 500m to just below 700m ASL. Band 3, scores 4 points (This is the Creag Mhor banding) from 700m to just below 900m ASL. Band 4, scores 6 points from 900m to just less than 1000m ASL, Band 5, scores 8 points from 1000m to just below 1100m ASL and Band 6 peaks above 1100m score 10 points. The current reflector has interesting comments by GM4COX speculating on a Nepalese/Tibetan association, the likely points bandings and winter bonus dates.

Back in Scotland driving up to Creag Mhor through Inverness my approach followed the interminable A9(T) to the village of Helmsdale clinging to the east coast. There is a more direct minor road passing through Glen Loth but I chose to stay on the A9(T) as an east coast seaview was a pleasing novelty. There was a gold rush in Helmsdale during the 19th century, but as I drove north, there was no rush to arrive then turn left (west) on the single track A897 to turn left again to the railway station at Kinbrace. After crossing the railway line the B871 continues to reach Badanloch lodge and there is a large area for parking on the south side of the public road (Grid reference; NC801330) close to the river Helmsdale at its outflow from Loch Badanloch.

I got my size 9 walking boots laced up but the start of the day involves a cycle along a very well maintained track with an excellent surface, small racing bike tyres would not have survived, but care and a hybrid should have been OK. On the full fat mountain bike the 13.5km into the stalkers path will take you some time and effort, as I discovered. The track goes past a loch with fishing boats, a picnic table and a no unauthorised vehicles sign. It will take you over an hour to reach a trackside quarry (NC685310) on the left just past the start of the stalker path, where you can stash your metal steed. There is a well-defined stalker path which starts at NC 686310 heading SE and later south. The surface is mainly grass with evidence of recent quad bike and historic Land Rover activity.

I read on Sotawatch that GM/NS-065 was activated for a second time 3 days after me and the operator (G4YSS) had permission from the Badanloch and Loch Choire estate managers to drive down the track from the public B871, saving a walking or cycling distance of 27km (2 x 13.5 km).

Low cloud covered the hilltops but the gentle east wind didn’t move the vegetation cropped by the many herds of red deer. There was some light drizzle on the approach - rain looked likely.
The stalkers track climbs alongside the fence of a deciduous plantation of mainly birch trees and rising to GR NC696296 then traverses the side of Meall nan Aighean. It loses 60 metres in height then continues uphill again south below Ben Armine; although I couldn’t see the summit; Gorm loch beag is a useful feature for navigation.

About a kilometre past the lochan a smaller stalkers track branches right (GR NC702261) to a vague bealach between Ben Armine and Creag Mhor. This well-defined track must soon be abandoned after a generous kilometre for a cross country trek south through peat hags and rough ground. You soon start climbing again after crossing a burn and you then follow your nose to the summit going slightly east of south. The summit of Creag Mhor has a triangulation station and a diminutive surrounding wall offering a lee shelter if there is any wind 713 metres ASL (Band 3, 4 points). The drizzle had stopped soon after setting off but the cloud still obscured any views on arriving at the summit.

The brass screw cap had already been plundered from the trig pillar, which made it ideal for a fishing pole mast. The gently rounded summit consists of a lovely blanket of springy moss and alpine plants so there was ample space for the lengthy 40m inverted-V dipole.

Once all of the civil engineering was completed I retired under my orange coloured bivouac shelter, connected the LiFePO4 battery, aerial and microphone to my FT817 and started calling CQ, SSB. There were good Orange and Vodaphone phone network signals so I spotted myself on the SOTA website. The first 40m QSO was at 08:49 UTC; M3FEX followed quickly by G3VXJ and G4IAR. A regular Spanish station EA2CKX was the fourth contact so a successful activation completed. Then G3RDQ, next a Belgian station ON5SWA, and Don G0RQL at 08:57, contributing a modest 4 points to his 100,000 point chaser total and adding another unique summit; well done Don and many, many thanks for all of our contacts and your Spots.

My intention had been to try 20m and 2m but my feet were wet and I had a hectic timetable collecting the boss that afternoon in Aviemore; I really couldn’t be late for that! So I packed up and headed off to the nearby Graham Ben Armine. I retraced my steps back to the stalkers track and despite roughly following a compass bearing, arrived exactly where my earlier footprints had started. From there it was easier than I thought to climb north the 250 vertical metres to the summit of GM/NS-069, Ben Armine - Creag a’Choire Ghlais. It was almost on my way back to the bike parking.

The peak had a first and only activation by G4YSS on 08/05/2015 and the summit is a large flat area with some very small cairns at the summit. There is no trig point and it has the same soft springy moss covering as the earlier peak. Despite there being no shelter from the cairns I set up next to them and started calling on 40 metres. Again there was a good phone signal. At 10:42 UTC I spoke with G0VWP, EA2CKX again, G4OSB/P (but not on a summit), G0RQL again (another 4 points for Dons’ chaser total), G0GWY, and at 10:48 G7BGA.
Despite the time pressure, the weather had improved and my feet were warm again after the second ascent so I strung up the 20m antenna and at 11:01 EA2DR (Pola), DL3HXX, OK2PDT, a transatlantic QSO, 9A7W and OE6GND. Quite a good spread from an output of 4.7 watts. Despite continuing to call there were no further contacts and again I packed up and reluctantly started for home.

Taking care to avoid the crags of Coire na Saidhe Duibhe, and helped by the clearing weather, I took a more or less direct, and initially very steep descent back to the stalkers track. Once there it was a swift return to the estate road with the only track in the dust was the one caused by my approach tyres. A return bike ride is always somewhat slower than the approach and stopping to look back at the now clear summits didn’t help.
Two Golden Eagles were quartering the sky on my return, but they moved away being wary of humans. Unusual to see two eagles together. During the day I had also seen Red Deer, Hares up top, Rabbits near the track, Ptarmigan, Golden Plover, Green Plover (Peewits), Curlews and Ravens but no humans. I had contact with plenty of humans, but had also been charmed by the calls of Green Plover (Peewits), Curlews and Snipe drumming! A long way for 8 activator points, but on a day such as that, well worth the effort.

Note: all grid references were derived from the 1:50,000 ordnance survey landranger map, they are not GPS results.

73, Colwyn MM0YCJ

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SOTA NEWS FROM JAPAN by Toru JH0CJH

May is the best season in Japan and has a long holiday at the beginning, also there were very few rainy days this May. This pushed up the number of SOTA activations. The total number of QSO’s reported on the SOTA database is up by 50% compared with last month.

SOTA activities in May 2017 in Japan as of 31 May 2017.

Activation

Total 245 Activations with 2899 QSO have been made and reported.

JA: 240 activations with 2873 QSO from Summits
JA5: 2 activations with 7 QSO from Summits
JA6: 3 activations with 19 QSO from Summits
JA8: 0

Chasing

Total 545 Chasing QSO have been made and reported.

JA: 495 chasing QSO
JA5: 3 chasing QSO
JA6: 47 chasing QSO
JA8: 0

S2S

Total 248 S2S QSO have been made and reported.

JA: 241 S2S QSO
JA5: 2 S2S QSO
JA6: 5 S2S QSO
JA8: 0

Japan local FM radio station FM Palulun broadcasts a ham radio program
every Sunday night. On 28 May, the interview with Eva HB9FPM and Andy HB9JOE that
was recorded last month, was broadcast.

Please listen at this web site.

http://hamsradio.net/ham/?p=4508

Eva and Andy


Toru Kawauchi
toru@kawauchi.homeip.mydns.jp
http://www.kawauchi.homeip.mydns.jp/jh0cjh/blog/

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THE VIEW FROM THE NORTH - 113 By Rob and Audrey G4RQJ

Sorry to say this months effort is going to be short due to a number of circumstances. My (Audrey 's) knee continues to be troublesome although improving whilst Rob has recently had an eye operation in Manchester this has left him with one working eye for the present which makes typing difficult and driving impossible. Hence me being roped in to type. This has reduced our activations to zero and even chasing is quite a chore as he has to write everything on his pad three inches high. He is sorry to have missed John YSS in his Scottish trip as he enjoys top band activity. In fact as John performed his first top band activation Rob was lying on his back having his right eye re -bored.

The race is now on to get the whole show back on the road for our usual trip to the Isle of Man in July. We don’t know how we will be but Mull Hill GD-005 will be a permanent roost. The trams will be running on Snaefell GD-01 and we can always hobble to the trig. So sorry that’s all for now .

Take care out there,

73’s Rob and Audrey
G4RQJ.

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*********** SOTA NEWS PART 2 FOLLOWS BELOW ********


#2

SOTA NEWS JUNE 2017 - Part 2

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EA6/ON7DQ Mallorca SOTA tour May 2017 – Luc ON7DQ

This is a report on my recent SOTA tour on Mallorca (EA6/MA) from 7 – 21 May 2017.
In summary, I spent 15 days on Mallorca, and in 13 of those days, I activated 17 summits. I had planned to do 20, but had to cancel four summits for various reasons : not accessible, too much delay on a first summit, or just too hot … and the beach being more attractive at that point, hi.
I added one summit “on the fly” which was not planned.

In chronological order, these were the summits I activated on this tour :
07/May/2017 EA6/MA-060 (Santa Magdalena)
08/May/2017 EA6/MA-052 (Puig de Maria)
09/May/2017 EA6/MA-017 (Puig d’Alaró)
09/May/2017 EA6/MA-021 (Talaia de Cals Reis)
10/May/2017 EA6/MA-048 (Fumat)
10/May/2017 EA6/MA-077 (Talaia d’Albercutx)
11/May/2017 EA6/MA-066 (Puig se San Marti)
12/May/2017 EA6/MA-034 (Puig de Ferrutx)
13/May/2017 EA6/MA-076 (Puig des Recó)
13/May/2017 EA6/MA-065 (Puig de sa Cova Negra)
15/May/2017 EA6/MA-063 (Jaumell)
16/May/2017 EA6/MA-056 (Puig de Bonany)
17/May/2017 EA6/MA-053 (Puig de son Seguí)
18/May/2017 EA6/MA-080 (Puig de sa Font)
19/May/2017 EA6/MA-035 (Puig de Sant Salvador)
20/May/2017 EA6/MA-032 (Santuari de Cura)
20/May/2017 EA6/MA-042 (Puig de Caldent)

In total, I made 528 QSO’s, an average of 31 per summit. I had a peak of 59 QSO’s on EA6/MA-056 (Puig de Bonany) on May 16.
Propagation was not always at its best, signals were often weak, heavy QSB made it even very hard at some times, but it was never a problem to get the minimum of 4 QSO’s.
Also glad to have logged several ON stations, with Karel, ON4FI my top ON chaser (what did you expect ?).
Also nice … 35 Summit-to-Summit (S2S) contacts, an average of 2 per summit. This brought me to the number 1 place in the S2S ranking for Belgium with 895 points. Not bad, since I will probably never make it to number 1 as activator nor chaser … hi.
One of the highlights of this trip was of course meeting Ricardo, EA6AIF, the new Regional Manager for EA6/MA.

Read the rest of this story on my blog :

More “summit per summit” stories will appear there soon. Subscribe if you want to be noticed of a new post each time.

73 and thanks for all the contacts !

Luc ON7DQ

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SOTA Portugal – Paulo CT2IWW

SOTA Portugal enthusiasts gathered in the northern city of Valença do Minho on Saturday, May 20th to attend the fourth edition of our annual meeting. The day´s scheduled presentations opened with an introduction to the activity by Paulo Teixeira, CT2IWW, followed by a balance of the previous year´s Summits on the Air activity in the country. Filling in for the national Association´s manager, who couldn´t attend the gathering, Paulo pointed out that the SOTA program is growing by leaps and bounds in Portugal thanks to renewed interest, undoubtedly empowered by events like National SOTA Day, annual meetings and gatherings at ham radio events.

CT2IWW SOTA Presentation

Next in order was Pedro Carvalho, CT1DBS/CU3HF, with a very detailed and highly informative presentation on chart reading and basic land orientation skills. Thanks to this true “masterclass” CT activators have now another highly effective tool in their repertoire to aid with preparation and navigation, particularly into unknown territory.

CT1DBS Charts presentation

After the lunch break, Emmanuel Lomba, CT7AFR, indulged the attendees with another detailed and highly informative presentation on batteries for SOTA activations. Battery power is the number one source of energy for activators, who are now better informed on the use and care of this highly important accessory, particularly the kind that uses the more modern lithium ion technologies.

CT7AFR Battery Presentation

The day was rounded out with a guided visit to the fortified city of Valença, a border town of highly important strategic value during the independence movement from de Felipe dynasty of Spain, which ruled Portugal for close to 150 years, and the fight to repel Napoleon´s invasion during the peninsular wars, at the turn of the 18th century. The guided visit was an offer from the municipality of Valença do Minho.

On Sunday, the meeting went literally beyond borders, with a joint activation by about a dozen activators and their families of EA1/PO-019 , a reference located on the neighboring Spanish municipality of Tui. The picturesque locale was the perfect stage to wrap up this year´s meeting with style and elegance.
The two day event was made possible by the radio club ARAM (Associação de Radioamadores do Alto Minho), with collaboration of the municipality of Valença do Minho, who made available the local library´s meeting room and provided a guided tour of the fortified city.

Joint Activation

Paulo Teixeira, CT2IWW

=====================================================

SOTA NEW ZEALAND REPORT from Warren ZL2AJ

Note from Editor:-
Warren complies a bi-monthly report for the New Zealand national magazine after the end of the month, to allow him to collect all the statistics. This is forwarded along to me during the first few days of a new month but misses our publication deadline on the last day of the month.

The next issue will be included in the July news – Mark

======================================================

France SOTA tour – Paul DL6FBK

At the end of April I went for a short trip near Avignon (F/CR area) and there was a possibility to
activate two summits. On 25th April I activated the Mont Ventoux F/CR-007 It was very cold and windy.

Furthermore I actvated a new one, Carabelle, F/CR-317.
Between 08 of may and 10 of may I activated some summits at the FL/VO aerea.
Le Baerenberg, FL/VO 027, Le Denon FL/VO 027; le Petit Denon, FL/VO 023; FL/VO-092 Le Kohlberg;
FL/VO 092 Kohlberg; FL/VO Le Champ du Feu; FL/VO-069 Le Ungersberg; FL/VO-070 le Mt St Odile
and for a first activation FL/VO - 100 le Heidenkopf.

Below are some photos of these activations

Best 73

Paul DL6FBK

======================================================

SOTA ON TOP BAND - Mark G0VOF

Hello everyone & welcome to this month’s edition of SOTA on Top Band.

After the bumper crop of Top Band QSO’s last month only one 160m QSO was logged in the database this month.

John G4YSS enjoyed a break in Northern Scotland & whilst there activatied several summits & also put on several squares for WAB chasers. It was during his activation of GM/NS-065 Creag Mhor, a summit that until a few days before remained un-activated (see Colwyn MM0YCJ’s report earlier in this edition), that Top Band was tried. John managed one QSO using CW on 10th May with relatively local friend Ray GM3PIL.

Whilst Top Band was tried from other summits, their remote nature & a suspected amplifier fault meant this was the only successful 160m contact John made during this trip.

As is usual for John, a superbly detailed report can be found here:

G4YSS: GM/NS-065 - Creag Mhor & WAB NC72, 10-05-17

Thanks & well done John!

At the time of writing, that was the only Top band activation during May that I am aware of, if I have missed any others please let me know.

On 10 May, John GM4YSS/P Activated GM/NS-065 Creag Mhor & made 1 QSO’s (1 CW / 0 SSB)

As always, If you do have any suggestions on things that you think should be included, or if you wish to contribute tips, ideas or anything else that you think may help others on the band please email them to me at mark@brownhill.demon.co.uk

Until next month,

Best 73,

Mark G0VOF

========================================================

CW REPORT FOR MAY 2017 - Roy G4SSH

HF Conditions remained pretty poor for most of May, but this was compensated for by the appearance of such rare countries as TF-Iceland and OY-Faroe Islands, with Alerts already posted for a further TF expedition in June. There were also numerous muli-op expeditions active. Propagation did appear to show a slight improvement during the final week.

Highlights of the month included:-

Sigrid DL2FAZ/p with Harry DF7FX/p continued their tour around summits in Germany.
Phil OK/G4OBK/p & Victor OK/G4ONL/p completed a tour of Czechia
David HB0/N3II/p, was active from Liechtenstein
Michael GD0HIO/p heard working summits on the Isle of Man.
George, SV7/SV9DJO/p was active from the Thrase region of Greece.
Tonnie CT7/PA9CW/p was in Spain.
Gerry EA8/PA1AT/p on Gomera Island in the Canaries
Paul DL/HB9AXL/p in Germany
Thomas LX/DL1ASA/p in Luxembourg
Hans DL/HB9BQU/p, in Germany
Jürg DL/HB9BIN/p, in Germany
Zoran, E70AA active at weekends from Bosnia.
Matt, DL/HB9FVF/p in Germany.
Luc, EA6/ON7DQ/p on Mallorca
Jarek OK/SP9MA/p in Czechia
Paul, F/DL6FBK/p in France
Hans EA/PB2T/p in Spain
Kurt F/HB9AFI/p in France
Bernd, OE/DF9GU/p in Austria
Max, 9A/OE5EIN/p, in Croatia.
Fred OK/DL8DXL/p in Czechia
SV/OE6DOE/p in Greece
Jarek OK/SP9MA/p in Czechia
Jarek OM/SP9NA in Slovakia
Mike OM/OK1SAM in Slovakia
Tom, EA7/DL8DBW/p in Cadiz
Martin OY/DF3MC/p on the Faroe Islands
Emil OY/DL8JJ/p on the Faroe Islands
Cris OE/HB9GIN/p in Austria.
Heinz DL/OE5EEP/p in Germany
DL/PA0SKP was active from Germany
F/HB9IIO/p was active from France
9A/S53X/p was active from Croatia
SV/OE6DOE was active from Greece
DL/HB9DIZ/p was active from Germany
PA/YO2BB/p was active from The Netherlands
OK/OM6AC/p was active from Czechia

73

Roy G4SSH
g4ssh@tiscali.co.uk

========================================================

SOTA ACTIVITY REPORT FOR MAY 2017 by Kevin G0NUP

Mode: CW on 1.8MHz: activity for May

GM4YSS/P, OK/G4ONL/P

Mode: CW on 3.5MHz: activity for May

F5UBH/P, F8DQY/P, K7VK, K9PM/P, LA1KHA/P, NA6MG,
OK1MLP/P, S53OM/P

Mode: CW on 5MHz: activity for May

DF7FX/P, DG5E/P, DJ2MX/P, DK2RO/P, DK4RW/P, DL/HB9BIN/P,
DL/HB9FVF/P, DL3TU/P, DL4FO/P, DL4TO/P, DL6FBK/P, GM4COX/P,
GW3RDQ/P, HB9AFI/P, HB9AGO/P, HB9BCB/P, HB9BIN/P, HB9BQB/P,
HB9BQU/P, HB9BSH/P, HB9CBR/P, HB9CGA/P, HB9DQM/P, HB9FVF/P,
HB9IIO/P, HB9JOE/P, HB9SOTA, HB9TVK/P, K6HPX/P, K9PM/P,
KR7RK, N2GBR, N7CW, N7LP, OM3CUG/P

Mode: SSB on 5MHz: activity for May

DD5LP/P, DL/HB9FVF/P, DL4TO/P, G0AZA/P, G0AZB/P, G4IPB/P,
G4MD/P, GI0AZA/P, GI0AZB/P, GM4COX/P, GW4TQE/P, GW4VPX/P,
GW8TMV/P, M0JCQ/P, MM0FMF/P, MW0JLA/P, MW0WML/P, MW1MAJ/P

Mode: CW on 7MHz: activity for May

9A/OE5EIN/P, 9A6CW/P, AA1MI/P, AC0PR, AC1Z, AI4SV,
CT1DBS/P, CT7/PA9CW/P, DD7II/P, DF7FX/P, DF9GU, DG5E/P,
DJ2MX/P, DJ9MH/P, DK2RO/P, DK4RW/P, DK6YM/P, DK7FH/P,
DL/HB9AXL/P, DL/HB9BHW/P, DL/HB9BIN/P, DL/HB9BQU/P, DL/HB9FPM/P, DL/HB9FVF/P,
DL/HB9JOE/P, DL/OE5EEP, DL/ON6UU/P, DL/PA0SKP/P, DL/PA7ZEE/P, DL2FAZ/P,
DL2XL/P, DL3TU/P, DL4CF/P, DL4TO/P, D Karel, ON4FI my top ON chaser6WT/P, DL8DXL/P, DS1QKF/P, EA/OE6WIG/P, EA/PB2T/P, EA1AER/P,
EA2BD/P, EA5FV, EA6/ON7DQ/P, F/DL6FBK/P, F/HB9AFI/P, F/HB9IIO/P,
F/PB2T/P, F4KJP/P, F5AKL/P, F5HTR/P, F5LKW/P, F5UBH/P,
F5UKL/P, F6FTB/P, F6HBI/P, F8DQY/P, G0HIO/P, G0MFR/P,
G0POT/P, G4WTF/P, GD0HIO/P, GM0GAV/P, GM4COX/P, GM4YSS/P,
GW3RDQ/P, GW4ISJ/P, HA/OK2PDT/P, HA/YO2BP/P, HA4FY/P, HA5CLF/P,
HA8LLH/P, HB9/PB2T/P, HB9AFI/P, HB9AGO/P, HB9AXL/P, HB9BAB/P,
HB9BCB/P, HB9BHU, HB9BHU/P, HB9BHW/P, HB9BIN/P, HB9BQB/P,
HB9BQU/P, HB9BRJ/P, HB9CBR/P, HB9CGA/P, HB9CGL/P, HB9CKV/P,
HB9CLT/P, HB9CPS, HB9CPS/P, HB9CZF/P, HB9DGV/P, HB9DPR/P,
HB9DQM/P, HB9EWO/P, HB9FVF/P, HB9IIO/P, HB9SOTA, HB9TVK/P,
HB9TWM/P, HL2OLP/P, I/HB9DQM/P, JA1KHZ/1, JA3NAP/1, JA3NAP/3,
JA4RQO/4, JF1NDT/1, JF1NDT/7, JF3KQA/3, JG1BOK, JL1NIE/1,
JP1QEC/1, JP3DGT/3, JR0QWW/0, JS1UEH/0, K1JD, K6HPX/P,
K7MK, K7PX, K9PM/P, KA5PVB, KB1KXL, KC7DM,
KE5AKL, KE7BGM, KK1W, KK4SW, KR7RK, KX0R,
KX6A, LA1EBA/P, LA1ENA/P, LA1KHA/P, LA3BO/P, LA3NGA/P,
LZ1GJ/P, M/PA0HRM/P, M0OAT/P, M1BUU/P, MM0FMF/P, MM0VFC/P,
MM3BRR/P, N0PCL, N0TA, N1FJ, N1GVT, N1OIE,
N2GBR, N4SFR, N6JZT, N7CQR, N7CW, N7LP,
NA6MG, NJ7V, NK6A, NM5S, NR7T, NS0TA,
NS1TA, NS7P, NU7A, OE/DF9GU, OE/HB9EWO/P, OE/N0MX,
OE5AUL/P, OE5EEP/P, OE6PKF/P, OE6RDD/P, OK/DL2DXA/P, OK/DL8DXL/P,
OK/G4OBK/P, OK/HA4FY/P, OK/HB9FVF/P, OK/OM2JU/P, OK/OM6AN/P, OK/SP3LRS/P,
OK/SP9MA/P, OK/SQ6GIT, OK1AU/P, OK1DO/P, OK1DVM/P, OK1FRT/P,
OK1HCD/P, OK1IF/P, OK1MLP/P, OK1NF/P, OK2BDF/P, OK2BTK/P,
OK2PDT/P, OK2PVX/P, OK2QA/P, OK3EQ/P, OK8DF/P, OM/HA4FY/P,
OM/OK2PDT/P, OM/SP9MA/P, OM3CUG/P, OM4AA/P, OM4DW/P, OM6AN/P,
ON/PA7ZEE/P, ON/YO2BP/P, OY/DF3MC/P, OY/DL8JJ/P, PA/SQ6GIT, PA/YO2BP/P,
PA7MDJ/P, PB2T/P, S5100PAX, S51RU/P, S52AU/P, S52FT/P,
S53OM/P, S53XX/P, SP3LRS/P, SP9MA/P, SQ6GIT/P, SV2OXS/P,
VK2MWP, VK2NU/P, VK3ARH, VK3IL/P, VK5CZ, W1EJ,
W6UB, W7JET, W7USA, WA6ARA, WA7JTM, WA9STI,
WB5USB, WC0Y, WC6J, WC9G, WG0AT, WH6LE,
WS0TA, WW7D, YO/HA8BJ/P

Mode: CW on 10MHz: activity for May

AA0BV, AA1MI/P, AB5ZA/P, AC0PR, AE7AP, AF7OS,
CT1DBS/P, DD7II/P, DG5E/P, DJ2MX/P, DK2RO/P, DK4RW/P,
DK7FH/P, DL/HB9AXL/P, DL/HB9BQU/P, DL/HB9BRJ/P, DL/OE5EEP, DL/ON6UU/P,
DL3TU/P, DL4FO/P, DL4MHA/P, DL4ROB, DL4TO/P, DL5FAB/P,
DL6FBK/P, DL8DXL/P, E70AA/P, EA/PB2T/P, EA2BD/P, EA2BSB/P,
EA2IF/P, EA2WX/P, EA6/ON7DQ/P, EI/WA9STI, EI3KA/P, F/HB9IIO/P,
F/HBIIO/P, F4HOD/P, F5HTR/P, F5LKW/P, F5UKL/P, F6HBI/P,
F8DQY/P, G0HIO/P, G0POT/P, G4TJC/P, G4YTJ/P, GD0HIO/P,
GM0GAV/P, GM4ERO/P, GW3RDQ/P, GW4ISJ/P, GW4TJC/P, GW8TMV/P,
HA/OK2PDT/P, HA/YO2BP/P, HA5CLF/P, HA7HF/P, HA8BJ/P, HA8LLH/P,
HB9/PB2T/P, HB9AFI/P, HB9AGO/P, HB9BAB/P, HB9BCB/P, HB9BIN/P,
HB9BQB/P, HB9BQU/P, HB9BRJ/P, HB9BSH/P, HB9CBR/P, HB9CGA/P,
HB9CLT/P, HB9CPS, HB9CZF/P, HB9DGV/P, HB9DPR/P, HB9DQM/P,
HB9EWO/P, HB9FVF/P, HB9IIO/P, HB9IIOP, HB9JOE/P, HB9SOTA,
HB9TVK/P, HB9TWM/P, JA1KHZ/1, JA4RQO/4, JF1NDT/1, JF1NDT/7,
JF8LPB/2, JG1BOK, JP3DGT/3, JR0QWW/0, JS1UEH/0, K0GUZ,
K0JQZ, K1JD, K6HPX/P, K7MK, K7PX, K7SO,
K7VK, K9PM/P, KA5PVB, KB1KXL, KC7DM, KD7WPJ,
KE5AKL, KG7VAK, KK1W, KR7RK, KT0A, KW4JM,
KX0R, LA1EBA/P, LA1ENA/P, LA1KHA/P, LA3BO/P, LA3NGA/P,
LA8BCA/P, LX/YO2BP/P, LZ1GJ/P, M1BUU/P, MM0BLF/P, MM0VFC/P,
MM3BRR/P, N0MTN, N0TA, N1FJ, N1OIE, N2GBR,
N4SFR, N6JZT, N7CW, N7LP, NA6MG, NJ7V,
NK6A, NM5S, NR7T, NS1TA, NS7P, NU7A,
NX1P/P, OE/DK2CX/P, OE/HB9EWO/P, OE/OM1WS/P, OE5AUL/P, OE5EEP/P,
OK/DL2DXA/P, OK/DL8DXL/P, OK/G4OBK/P, OK/G4ONL/P, OK/HB9FVF/P, OK/OM6AN/P,
OK/SP9MA/P, OK/YO2BP, OK1DVM/P, OK1MLP/P, OK2BDF/P, OK2BTK/P,
OK2PVX/P, OK2PYA/P, OK2SAM/P, OM/OK2SAM/P, OM3CUG/P, OM4DW/P,
OM4WY/P, ON/HB9JOE/P, OY/DF3MC/P, OY/DL8JJ/P, PA/YO2BP/P, PB2T/P,
S5100PAX, S51RU/P, S52FT/P, S53OM/P, S53XX/P, SP/YO2BP/P,
SP9MA/P, SQ6GIT/P, SV/OE6DOE/P, SV1RHL/P, SV2OXS/P, SV7/SV2CLJ/P,
W0CP, W1EJ, W7GA, WA7JTM, WA9STI, WB5USB,
WC6J, WG0AT, WW7D, YO/HA8BJ/P, YO/HA8LLH

Mode: CW on 14MHz: activity for May

9A/OE5EIN/P, 9A6CW/P, AA1MI/P, AA4Q, AB5ZA/P, AC0PR,
AC1Z, AE5KA, AE7AP, AE9Q, AI4SV, CT1DBS/P,
CT7/PA9CW/P, DD7II/P, DJ2MX/P, DK2RO/P, DK4RW/P, DK6YM/P,
DK7FH/P, DL/HB9AXL/P, DL/HB9BIN/P, DL/HB9BRJ/P, DL/HB9FVF/P, DL/HB9JOE/P,
DL/OE5EEP, DL/ON6UU/P, DL/PA0SKP/P, DL3TU/P, DL4CF/P, DL4TO/P,
DL6FBK/P, DL8DXL/P, E70AA/P, EA/PB2T/P, EA1AER/P, EA2BD/P,
EA2BSB/P, EA2IF/P, EA2WX/P, EA5FV, EA6/ON7DQ/P, EA7/HB9AFH/P,
EA8/PA1AT/P, EI/WA9STI, F/HB9AFI/P, F/HB9IIO/P, F/HBIIO/P, F/PB2T/P,
F5HTR/P, F5LKW/P, F5UKL/P, F6HBI/P, F8DQY/P, G0HIO/P,
G0MFR/P, G0POT/P, G4OIG/P, G4WSB/P, G4WTF/P, GD0HIO/P,
GM0GAV/P, GM4TOE/P, GM4YSS/P, GW4ISJ/P, HA/OK2PDT/P, HA/YO2BP/P,
HA8LLH/P, HB9/PB2T/P, HB9AFI/P, HB9AGO/P, HB9AXL/P, HB9BAB/P,
HB9BCB/P, HB9BHU/P, HB9BHW/P, HB9BIN/P, HB9BQU/P, HB9CBR/P,
HB9CGA/P, HB9CGL/P, HB9CKV/P, HB9CLT/P, HB9CPS, HB9CPS/P,
HB9CZF/P, HB9DGV/P, HB9DPR/P, HB9DQM/P, HB9EWO/P, HB9FVF/P,
HB9IIO/P, HB9IIOP, HB9JOE/P, HB9SOTA, HB9TVK/P, HB9UAG/P,
HG8PQ/P, IK5QPS/P, JA4RQO/4, JF1NDT/1, JF1NDT/7, JG1BOK,
JL1NIE/1, JP1QEC/0, JP1QEC/1, JP3DGT/3, JP3PPL/3, JS1UEH/0,
JS1UEH/1, JS1UEH/7, K0GUZ, K6HPX/P, K6TW, K7MK,
K7PX, K7SO, K7VK, K9PM/P, KA5PVB, KB1KXL,
KC7DM, KD0S, KD7WPJ, KE5AKL, KF7SEY, KG7VAK,
KH6/DL3LUM, KK1W, KR7RK, KT0A, KW4JM, KX0R,
KX6A, LA1EBA/P, LA1ENA/P, LA3BO/P, LA3NGA/P, LA8BCA/P,
LZ1GJ/P, M0OAT/P, M1BUU/P, MM3BRR/P, N0PCL, N0TA,
N1FJ, N1GVT, N1OIE, N2GBR, N4SFR, N6JZT,
N6KZ, N7CQR, N7CW, N7LP, N7SRG, NA6MG,
ND9Q, NJ7V, NK6A, NK8Q, NM5S, NR7T,
NS0TA, NS1TA, NS7P, NU7A, NX1P/P, OE/HB9EWO/P,
OE5AUL/P, OE5EEP/P, OK/DL2DXA/P, OK/DL8DXL/P, OK/G4OBK/P, OK/G4ONL/P,
OK/HB9FVF/P, OK/OM2JU/P, OK/SP3LRS/P, OK/SP9MA/P, OK1AU/P, OK1CZ,
OK1CZ/P, OK1DVM/P, OK1MLP/P, OK2BDF/P, OK2BTK/P, OK2PDT/P,
OK2PYA/P, OK2SAM/P, OM/OK2PDT/P, OM/SP9MA/P, OM3CUG/P, OM4AA/P,
OM4WY/P, OM6AN/P, ON/HB9JOE/P, OY/DF3MC/P, OY/DL8JJ/P, PB2T/P,
S5100PAX, S51RU/P, S52AU/P, S52FT/P, S53OM/P, S53XX/P,
SP3LRS/P, SP9MA/P, SV/OE6DOE/P, SV1RHL/P, SV2OXS/P, SV7/SV9DJO/P,
SV9/OE7PHI/P, VA2VL, VA2VL/W1, VK5CZ, W0CP, W1EJ,
W6UB, W7GA, W7JET, W7USA, WA6ARA, WA6MM,
WA7JTM, WA9STI, WB5USB, WC0Y, WC6J, WC9G,
WG0AT, WH6LE, WS0TA, WW7D, WX, WX4TW,
YO/HA8BJ/P, YO/HA8LLH

Mode: CW on 18MHz: activity for May

CT1DBS/P, DL/HB9BRJ/P, DL/OE5EEP, DL4FO/P, DL4TO/P, EA6/ON7DQ/P,
F4HOD/P, F5UKL/P, F6HBI/P, G4OIG/P, HB9AGO/P, HB9BCB/P,
HB9BIN/P, HB9BQU/P, HB9BSH/P, HB9CBR/P, HB9CGA/P, HB9DQM/P,
HB9EWO/P, HB9FVF/P, HB9IIO/P, HB9SOTA, JA1KHZ/1, JA4RQO/4,
JF1NDT/1, JF1NDT/7, JL1NIE/1, JP1QEC/0, JP1QEC/1, JP3DGT/3,
JR0QWW/0, JS1UEH/0, JS1UEH/1, JS1UEH/7, K1JD, K6HPX/P,
K7ATN, K9PM/P, KB1KXL, KK1W, KR7RK, KT0A,
KX0R, LA3BO/P, M0OAT/P, M1BUU/P, N1FJ, NA6MG,
NM5S, NS0TA, NS1TA, NS7P, NX1P/P, OE5EEP/P,
OK1MLP/P, OM3CUG/P, OY/DF3MC/P, OY/DL8JJ/P, S52FT/P, W0CP,
WA7JTM, YO/HA8LLH, ZL1BYZ

Mode: CW on 21MHz: activity for May

7M4EZB, 9V1/W6BJB, CT1DBS/P, DL/HB9BRJ/P, HB9BIN/P, HB9CBR/P,
JA4RQO/4, JF1NDT/1, JF1NDT/7, JF3KQA/3, JF8LPB/2, JL1NIE/1,
JP1QEC/0, JP1QEC/1, JP3DGT/3, K1JD, KB1KXL, KE7BGM,
KR7RK, KT0A, LA3BO/P, M1BUU/P, NA6MG, OK1CZ/P,
OK1MLP/P, OK2BDF/P, VK5CZ

Mode: CW on 24MHz: activity for May

JF1NDT/1, JF1NDT/7, JP3DGT/3, JS1UEH/1, OK1MLP/P

Mode: CW on 28MHz: activity for May

CT1DBS/P, HB9CBR/P, JA4RQO/4, JF1NDT/1, JF1NDT/7, JP3DGT/3,
KR7RK, OK1MLP/P

Mode: CW on 50MHz: activity for May

JA4RQO/4, JF1NDT/1, JF1NDT/7, JF3KQA/3, JS1UEH/0, JS1UEH/1,
KD7WPJ, KR7RK, OE1WED/3, OE3IPU/P, OK1FRT/P, OM/OK2PDT/P,
W7USA, WA7JTM

Mode: CW on 1240MHz: activity for May

Mode: FM on 28MHz: activity for May

Mode: FM on 50MHz: activity for May

JJ3AMO/3, JS2VVH/2, OE1WED/3

Mode: FM on 1240MHz: activity for May

DG4MIC, GW7HEM/P, JG6CRU/6, JN3IWE, JN3PDF/3, JS1GRO/1,
JS2VVH/2, K0JJW, K0NR, VK7ZMS

Mode: SSB on 28MHz: activity for May

2E0YYY/P, EA3HP/P, HB9FVF/P, HB9TNF/P, KF7SEY, KJ6QDU,
OE/IW3AGO/P, OE5REO/P, S52AU/P, S56LXN/P, S57MS/P, SV2CLJ/P,
VK3YY, WX4ET/P

Mode: SSB on 50MHz: activity for May

7K1BAE, JA1KHZ/1, JF1NDT/1, JF3KLH/3, JF3KQA/3, JG1XRA/1,
JH1EWV/1, JI1IKC/1, JI1TLL/0, JI1TLL/7, JK1NRL/1, JL1BWG/1,
JM3HRC/2, JM3HRC/3, JM3URG/3, JR1NNL/1, JS1JNM/1, JS1UEH/0,
JS1UEH/1, JS1UEH/7, JS2VVH/1, JS2VVH/2, K7VK, KD7WPJ,
NJ7V, OE1WED/3, S52AU/P, S56LXN/P, S57MS/P, SV2CLJ/P,
VE7FAA, VE7GDE, VE7LSE, VK1AD/2, W7USA, WA7JTM

Mode: SSB on 1240MHz: activity for May

M0DDC/P, OE5JKL/P, SV2CLJ/P

73 de Kevin G0NUP

========================================================

SOTA News is normally published on the last day of each month, but there will be occasions when the Editor is not available at this time, in which case it will be published as soon as possible afterwards. It can only be as interesting as the items submitted, so if you think your particular field of interest is not being covered then please submit an article by the 25th of the month.

Have you a favourite SOTA? favourite mode? favourite rig, antenna, or favourite band? How did you find your first day / month / year as an activator or chaser? Your comments and experiences will be read by enthusiasts all across Europe, the USA, Australia and beyond, in a total of 114 different SOTA associations worldwide. Your input will be most welcome.

We receive many e-mails during the month containing details of activations, milestones reached and general SOTA news. Unless advised otherwise we will use this information in the next edition of SOTA News. It is important therefore that you advise us if any information is not intended for publication.

For ease of processing, please submit your input by e-mail direct to the addresses below and not via the Reflector.

==================================================

Mark G0VOF
SOTA News Editor
mark@brownhill.demon.co.uk

U.S. and Canadian reports to:-
Fred K6DGW/7 [aka “Skip” on the radio]
Canada/US SOTA Reporter Dude
Sparks NV
k6dgw@foothill.net

Australian input to:-
Allen VK3ARH
VK Reporter
VK3ARH@wia.org.au

New Zealand input to:-
Warren ZL2AJ
warren@zl2aj.com

Japanese reports to
Toru JH0CJH
jh0cjh@jarl.com

South African input to:-
Dennis ZS4BS
zs4bs@netactive.co.za


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