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ft817nd cw filter


#1

In reply to G0HIO:

I don’t have the cw filter in my FT-817ND and manage ok, even through the 7.032 cw gauntlet, hi, obviously the filter would be a big improvement, but you can manage ok without it.

73 Mike GW0DSP


#2

In reply to G0HIO:

I use the FT817ND without Filters with no problems at all. Regarding the internal batteries - I have taken them out for 2 reasons. 1 - when using the internal batteries the power is automatically dropped 50% so max O/P 2.5 watts! 2 - because of 1 above they are extra weight.

I use a 3.3Ah SLAB which I use for CW/SSB/FM and it has never run out on me yet - longest operation 3 hours.

Hope this helps

73
Glyn…GM4CFS


#3

In reply to G0HIO:

Don’t have to think about that one, go 100% with the slab, you will get the full 5 watts for quite some time, without problems, I rarely use the internal pack, basically I use it just enought to keep the charge/discharge cycle going.

73 Mike GW0DSP


#4

In reply to G0HIO:

The usability of the FT817 without a CW filter depends largely on your CW skills. If you are a confident and competent operator, the filter (while desirable) is not necessary. If, on the other hand, you class yourself as a CW beginner, the filter will make a big difference.

I opted for the SSB filter in my FT-817.

73

Richard
G3CWI


#5

In reply to G0HIO:

I have the 350Hz narrow Collins CW filter in my 817 and I think it’s fabulous. Bit harder to find than the 500Hz one.

I found this on the net…

You could save a lot of money by buying one from the USA.

Ian GW8OGI


#6

In reply to GM4CFS:
Glyn, you can manually set the power back to 5 watts when using the internal batteries.

I used a set of 2500 mAh NiMH’s in the battery holder with the green wire cut (to enable charging without removing from the rig) without any trouble and the power lasts long enough for a long activation. Using a slab involves generation of extra heat since the rig drops the voltage to 9.6, this seems to not be a problem unless perhaps the rig is in the sun on a hot day, but actually there is a lot of on-board heat from the voltage drop and this can lead to the printed circuit track from the power socket lifting from the board and breaking. However, when this happened to me I soldered on a piece of thick wire to repair and reinforce the track.

I use the past tense because I have upgraded to an FT857D - if its good enough for INKy its good enough for me…and it cost less than I paid for an 817 four years ago!

73

Brian G8ADD


#7

In reply to G8ADD:

In reply to GM4CFS:
Glyn, you can manually set the power back to 5 watts when using the
internal batteries.

I used a set of 2500 mAh NiMH’s in the battery holder with the green
wire cut (to enable charging without removing from the rig) without
any trouble and the power lasts long enough for a long activation.
Using a slab involves generation of extra heat since the rig drops the
voltage to 9.6, this seems to not be a problem unless perhaps the rig
is in the sun on a hot day, but actually there is a lot of on-board
heat from the voltage drop and this can lead to the printed circuit
track from the power socket lifting from the board and breaking.
However, when this happened to me I soldered on a piece of thick wire
to repair and reinforce the track.

I use the past tense because I have upgraded to an FT857D - if its
good enough for INKy its good enough for me…and it cost less than
I paid for an 817 four years ago!

73

Brian G8ADD

Quite correct Brian BUT, in theory, at approx 450ma on rx and 2 amps on tx @ 5 watts, it’s quite simple maths and normal to expect approx 2 hours from a set of 2500Mah batteries, maybe longer on ssb and especially on cw, BUT, in reality I have never found this to be the case.

There has been many a story on the reflector quite recently, of activations cut short by activators using the internal battery pack or the dry cell case only.

Personally, I wouldn’t use anything other than a slab or a purpose built external 10 cell NiMah battery pack, for fail safe solid 5 watts usage on the FT-817ND, which was designed to run off 13.8 volts, so shouldn’t be any problem from the heat dissipation, caused by the voltage drop to 9.6v.
I use 7ah slabs, because on activations I alternate between the FT-817ND and FT-857D, but a 2.8ah/3ah would be fine and dandy for the FT-817ND and is much lighter ro carry up a summit than the 7ah.

Just my own personal opinion, I’m certainly no expert, hi, and would be interested to hear what the regular activators use.

73 Mike GW0DSP


#8

In reply to G0HIO:

I have the 500Hz CW filter in the 817 (and 706) but I guess I could manage without it some of the time.

My 817 power requirements are met using 8 internal AA 2.7Ah Ni/Mh’s. If I’m doing more than two summits (using 2 band/2 modes per summit) an external home-brew (soldered up) 11 x AA 2.7 Ah pack is connected to the rig via an (open) external miniature 2 Amp circuit breaker. The moment the internal batteries fail, I close the breaker, which feeds 13.2 V (nominal) into the rig. This way I know that I now have as much power as I’ve already had, which helps me to plan the next activation(s).

I chose to build an 11 cell AA Ni/Mh’s in preference to the available 3.3 Ah Lion pack because (as far as I know) it is lighter (1 oz or 28gm per cell) and certainly much cheaper. In an emergency, I can also run the IC706 2G for about ten 5W (or fewer 10W - max) mixed CW/SSB SOTA-length QSO’s but I wouldn’t make a habit of that.

To ‘avoid disappointment’ battery management is esential. The state of charge of any battery used for SOTA should be known (estimated) at all times. It can then be treat accordingly. In the absence of this knowledge, the battery should be discharged and recharged no more than a few days before it is required. Some recent data gathered here showed a 1/2% per day self-discharge rate for my 11 cell Ni/Mh AA, 2.7 Ah over 50 days. (I.e. 25% of capacity lost without any load applied). I can say first hand that sealed Lead-acids seem excellent on that score and I’m told that Lion batteries are good too (not tested).

I carry out periodic capacity testing of all batteries. You never know when a cell might fail etc. All results are entered into a log and the data used to monitor the ongoing state of each pack.

73, John G4YSS.


#9

In reply to G3CWI

The usability of the FT817 without a CW filter depends largely on your
CW skills.

As a struggling-to-become-competent CW operator I can confirm this! I wouldn’t be without it.

73 de Paul G4MD


#10

In reply to G4MD:

It is worth remembering that the FT817 has an IF shift facility. This can be a useful substitute for a CW filter in some cases. It is worth playing with it to see what it can do for you.

73

Richard
G3CWI


#11

Interesting comments all around. On the subject of filters, I used a TS130V with just a standard SSB filter for 20 years which proved adequate. Then through eBay I bought a secondhand CW filter and was amazed at how much easier this made CW operation, even in the comfort of a warm shack. Based on this experience, I aim to fit a CW filter to my 817 later in the year, since I have come to realise that concentrating on CW in cold wet blustery conditions on a hilltop needs extra skills which I don’t really think I have.

As for power, I use 3.3AH SLABs and like Glyn find them an ideal capacity, even when running a 25w linear. I have left the internal pack in the rig as this provides an easy back up which could prove to be extremely useful in an emergency situation. That reminds me… I must programme 446 into the rig.

73, Gerald


#12

In reply to G4OIG:
I use a stock Icom 350 Hz filter in the 706 II G… mainly chosen for RTTY but it’s “oh so quiet” on CW. I wouldn’t be without it.

You just have to be careful to use the RIT and catch callers who might be a little out of the passband.

…if I were in the market for a filter now (for an 817)… with the weak dollar, I would order the INRAD 300Hz (would be my choice) or 500Hz filter direct from them. $125 each.

73 Marc GØAZS


#13

When I was struggling to make progress learning CW, the introduction of the filter suddenly made copying much much easier.

FT-817 internal batteries are fine for a couple of hours at 2.5 watts. Where I came unstuck was by doing 1 or 2 activations daily, and there wasn’t sufficient time in between to recharge properly. I believe there is a fast charger you can get for the OPP817 2.3Ah battery.

The nice thing with the SLAB is that you can do a weekend of five activations (like us this weekend) without even thinking about recharging overnight etc.


#14

Bought my Yaesu CW filter, used, from a chap in Louisiana - it was a fixed price sale on ‘That’ auction site. Inclusive of shipping it cost me less than £65…

Wondering whether to fit the bhi DSP unit for use in/near urban areas…

73 Graham G4FUJ


#15

In reply to G4FUJ:

Hi Graham,

I had the bhi DSP fitted when I ordered the FT817 and I tend to use this alot so I for one recommend the bhi DSP.

de G0VWP

Terry


#16

In reply to G0VWP:

I bought the external BHI DSP unit, but after a few minutes use I realised that you can’t switch the auto-notch off whilst leaving the de-noiser on, so found it of limited value on CW!! (not quite what they said when I bought it HI). Is the '817 unit the same Terry?

The most dramatic effect for me is on 2metre/70cms SSB. It ‘subtracts’ the constant background noise and just sucks it away. Makes weak signal work less tiring. Amazing on satellite downlinks.

I don’t take it out on the hills though and it’s been back in it’s box for quite a while…

Ian GW8OGI


#17

In reply to GW8OGl:

Your right in what you say Ian
It subtracts the constant background noise and just sucks it away. Makes weak
signal work less tiring. Amazing on satellite down links.

And it works the same way as the external bhi DSP as a mate has the external one and we compered them.

Terry G0VWP


#18

In reply to G0VWP:
Thanks Terry.
I use the ‘big’ bhi external filter in the shack at home (on the IC-756), it helps on 60 and 80m (bad local noise here). I’ve read the reviews on the little filter board, just not sure I want to spend the pennies at present!
73 Graham G4FUJ