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Two found dead on Snowdon

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/north_west/7864422.stm

In reply to M0GIA:
Were they climbing or walking?

“No-one else should attempt the climb for at least a week”!? What is that man on? Give 24 hours for the powder to consolidate and the climbers will be queuing for the Trinity Gullies and Parsleyfern Gully, not to mention the more modern horrors! Mind you, being older and wiser (i.e chicken!) I would give it 48 hours…

I would say the main tracks would be safe for careful and well equipped walkers 48 hours after the last heavy snow unless avalanche conditions develope.

73

Brian G8ADD

In reply to G8ADD:

What is that man on?

He’s being professionally wary in today’s ridiculous Health & Safety culture and is aiming his comments not at those with the right gear, right attitude and right experience but those who may have done the odd hill walk and think they are up to a bit of winter wonderland.

But I do understand your point Brian.

Andy
MM0FMF

In reply to MM0FMF:

I’ve just watched the Llanberris MR leader being interviewed on the BBC website and his words were (roughly) “full winter conditions, if you are well equipped and experienced and know what you are doing then fine, otherwise if you are at all unsure, stay away for a week”.

Andy
MM0FMF

Surely statements saying 24, 48 hours or a week are all as inaccurate as each other. It depends entirely on the local weather in the next 24, 48 hours or next week.

Since the avalanche incident on Buachaille Etive Mor just over a week ago there has been some very poor advice written and broadcast by the media about winter conditions on the hill. However, the “Out of Doors” programme on BBC Radio Scotland this week-end gave what I thought was very good advice.

For those outside the BBC R Scot broadcast area, it is available on the BBC iPlayer or as a podcast from www.bbc.co.uk/radioscotland . The 01/02 programme is more or less arepeat of the 31/01 programme.

I am astonished at the number of people I meet on summits at any time of year (and especially in the winter) who see I have a radio and ask if I know what the weather forecast is. It frequently transpires that they haven’t seen a forecast in several days.

Robin, GM7PKT