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Trig pillars 75 years old

Shamelessly stolen from the RHB mailing list

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-northamptonshire-13130526

I never thought of mounting microwave gear on the pillar proper. Looking at the feed, probably around 4GHz. What’s the betting it was a 723b Klystron? ( http://www.oneillselectronicmuseum.com/largephotos/tubes/yel/yel76.jpg )

Andy
MM0FMF

In reply to MM0FMF:
How fascinating, I often wondered how these lumps of concrete came about. Thanks Andy.

Sean M0GIA

In reply to M0GIA:

I have come across a few trig pillars with their central brass plug missing. That is very useful, because a SOTA pole drops perfectly into the hole and is then self-supporting! Two examples local to me are Cleeve Hill and Aconbury Hill.

73,
Walt (G3NYY)

Sad thing is that many trig points have been apparently a subject of vandalism, such as removal of the brass plaque. Why one would climb 2000+ ft and then steal a bit of brass defeats me!

73s
Alan M0DDC

In reply to M0DDC:

Sad thing is that many trig points have been apparently a subject of
vandalism, such as removal of the brass plaque. Why one would climb
2000+ ft and then steal a bit of brass defeats me!

Someone nicked my next door neighbours wheelie bin last month. How sad is that!!!

Cost him £40 for a new one.

73
Mike 2E0YYY

In reply to 2E0YYY:

Someone nicked my next door neighbours wheelie bin last month. How sad
is that!!!

To use as a mold for a new trig pillar?

Handy for moving the bodies and they can then be filled with acid to dispose of them. Got any Russian or Ukrainian Bratva (The Brotherhood (Mafia))living nearby?

73 Steve GW7AAV

In reply to M0DDC:

Why one would climb 2000+ ft and then steal a bit of brass defeats me!

Why? To add to the collection of top caps. That’s why!

There’s several different designs been used over the years and a complete collection of all types is valuable. Even more valuable is a Flush Bracket. Luckily for those of us who appreciate the historical importance of a trig point, the concrete used by the OS was damn fine stuff mostly and removing the bracket requires a vandal bring a considerable number of “implements of destruction” along with him.

You can see that over time, the quality of concrete used declined. Some 1936/37 vintage trigs in exposed places are in perfect condition still. Even ones frequently visited. Later trigs show cost accounting had been appiled as the concrete has not stood up to the weather. Vanessa columns have suffered more, partly because they are in the more exposed positions and partly because of their affinity for attracting lightening strikes.

For the record, I have no top caps, flush brackets. Just photos and a fascination with the engineering and maths behind mapping a country.

Andy
MM0FMF