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Packing the kit


#1

Each time I activate a summit I seem to end up with an array of poly bags around me from which I’ve taken my HF dipole, guy ropes, mic / headphones, etc. All very untidy! As a precaution in case I ever lose one (which I have not done yet), I have been using Co-op carrier bags as they are bio-degradeable. When it’s windy, they get pushed in the rucksack and then I have to find them in order to pack the kit away. When it’s raining, it can all get a bit frantic.

I have avoided using plastic containers as they add weight to my already fairly heavy rucksack and tend to be inflexible.

I am wondering how others pack their kit and whether anyone has discovered a magic solution to this issue.

73, Gerald


#2

In reply to G4OIG:

Exped Dry bags Gerald. Big one to line the rucksack and small ones for the gear and clothing. I would have thought dry bags were an essential bit of kit to keep spare clothing dry for emergency use. Rucksacks are not waterproof

73 John GW4BVE


#3

I just use the side pockets of my rucsac for feeders/guys/mic etc. The main section has a liner in it, and fits my fleece, gloves, torch, coat, 817, dipole and flask. The SLAB goes in the zip compartment in the hood of the rucsac, underneath where the rain cover is. Smaller bits and pieces like adaptors, pencil, logbook etc go in the zip compartment in my map case. The only carrier bag in use is the one containing my flask, stuffed down the side of my rucsac. I don’t use any containers.


#4

In reply to G4OIG:

I use a 35L rucksac with no side pockets so everything goes inside the main sack or top. At the base is the survival bag, space blanket, a set of dry clothes and rations in dry bag (they stay in the bag permanently). The 817, T1, mic, key and cables go in a plastic container. The SLAB in a plastic bag (the only bag I carry) and an old tobacoo tin for bits and bobs. All of this along with the aerial and flask goes into the main part of the sack. The top compartment is used for gloves, hat, bungees, compass, map etc. Side straps hold the mast and beam in place. The plastc container weighs an ounce and worth it to hold every thing in place then serves as a surface to place the radio on. The handie and GPS clip to the shoulder straps and the camera on my belt.

73, Glyn


#5

In reply to GM4CFS:

Thanks for the replies so far - most useful!

Exped Dry bags - thanks for this one John. My rucksack top compartment is waterproof and is basically where I keep my spare clothing and (ironically) waterproof trousers. Dry bags within the rucksack seem to be the way to go.

My rucksack is a 35L like Glyn’s, and has two side pockets wherein I permanently keep my survival bits (with the exception of the 2 person bothy bag which stays inside the rucksack): two foil blankets, hi-viz waistcoat, torch, Kendal mint cake, etc. Inside my sack, the bothy bag is in the bottom, then the 817, 2m linear in its box, a foam pad to sit on and a small towel. The next layer is the HF antenna and then the mic/coax/headphones/other bits bag is on top. The SLAB(s) are in the front compartment with the guys, bungies, poly bag to put the kit in during wet weather and other bits.

Like Tom I have my pencils, pens, logsheets, WaterLog in the zip compartment in my map case.

I usually wear my anorak and fleece or strap them across the top of the rucksack. Gloves and hat are usually in pockets, along with the camera. The handie and GPS clip onto the bottom strap of the rucksack. I’ve stopped taking the TomTom with me and now leave it hidden in the car as they have come down in price and surprisingly if I operate 70cms on a summit, it has to be reset when I get back to the car even though it’s been switched off while operating.

I’m working on an easier way of carrying the big BNOS linear / 12AH SLAB. Also have been known to take a linear and beam for 70cms and then there is 23cms which will be faily heavy kit until I find a suitable rig.

Seems we do things in a similar fashion. I carry more than most,even without the extra bands, so the dry bag approach is likely to suit best.

73, Gerald


#6

In reply to GM4CFS:

I use a 35L rucksac

I’m obviously doing something wrong!!! I fill a 52L rucksack. My camera has to be carried in it own case as there usually isn’t any room in the rucksack.

73 Robin.


#7

In reply to GM7PKT:

I’m obviously doing something wrong!!! I fill a 52L rucksack.

Ah but Robin… there is that old rule that states if your rucksack is a particular size… you will always fill it. Go and get a 35L one and see how you get on. :slight_smile:

73 Marc GØAZS


#8

In reply to GM7PKT:
Me Too: 52L and it is sometimes not enough. All that fluffy clothing…?

73

Barry GM4TOE


#9

In reply to G0AZS:

In reply to GM7PKT:

I’m obviously doing something wrong!!! I fill a 52L rucksack.

Ah but Robin… there is that old rule that states if your rucksack is
a particular size… you will always fill it. Go and get a 35L one and
see how you get on. :slight_smile:

73 Marc GØAZS

Marc,
Certainly true for some non SOTA activities on the hill but I find that 52L only just accommodates the minimum safety and radio kit for SOTA trips.
Before the days of SOTA I used a 30L sack for radio expeditions but soon upgraded to a 35L sack. After purchasing an FT-817 and venturing onto 40/60/80 metres, I found 35L wasn’t really enough to carry all the hill gear + radio + antenna and associated bits.
I think Barry is probably correct, all the essential fluffy clothing and waterproofs (if they aren’t already being worn) take up all the space.

Robin, GM7PKT


#10

In reply to GM7PKT:

I AM THE SAME THINKING AS YOU ROBIN I MUST CARRY TO MUCH AS I HAVE A 65L PLUS 10L EXTRA ROOM IN MY KIT AND NEVER SEEM TO NOT NEED OR WILL NEED IN THE EVENT OF SOMETHING GOING WRONG OR SOME ONE HAVING PROBLEMS WE CARRIED MORE IN THE MARINES SO SPARE A THOUGHT GUYS FOR MARINES IN IRAQ AND ESPECIALLY IN AFGHANISTAN WHO BELIEVE YOU ME ARE CARRYING WEIGHT DAY IN DAY OUT 24/7
SO REMEMBER AL THOSE THINGS YOU THINK YOU DONT NEED COULD BE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LIFE AND DEATH AND WINTER TIME IS FAST APPROACHING ??? 73,S EVAN GM0PKX


#11

In reply to GM0PKX:

In reply to GM7PKT:

I AM THE SAME THINKING AS YOU ROBIN I MUST CARRY TO MUCH AS I HAVE A
65L PLUS 10L EXTRA ROOM IN MY KIT AND NEVER SEEM TO NOT NEED OR WILL
NEED IN THE EVENT OF SOMETHING GOING WRONG OR SOME ONE HAVING PROBLEMS
WE CARRIED MORE IN THE MARINES SO SPARE A THOUGHT GUYS FOR MARINES IN
IRAQ AND ESPECIALLY IN AFGHANISTAN WHO BELIEVE YOU ME ARE CARRYING
WEIGHT DAY IN DAY OUT 24/7
SO REMEMBER AL THOSE THINGS YOU THINK YOU DONT NEED COULD BE THE
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LIFE AND DEATH AND WINTER TIME IS FAST APPROACHING
??? 73,S EVAN GM0PKX

Good point Evan. There are a number of items that I carry but never normally look at. In the event of something going wrong for me (or possibly someone else) which results in an extended stay on a top these items could literally be a lifesaver.

73, Robin.