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Number 20

Moel Gyw looked like a good choice for my 20th Unique activation on 10GHz. Although the forecast was “iffy” to say the least I decided to give it a try. Two hours yielded five contacts - best DX 166km. The first two contacts (GD0EMG and G8DTF, Winter Hill) were made without talkback. G3Z/p on Brown Clee proved tricky as they had to beam into the hill to get the dish in my direction and I had to beam across CyB. We resorted to CW to complete. G3OHM down near Milton Keynes was an easy contact on SSB and they were amazed that I was just using a horn antenna. G3LRP in Wakefield was another easy contact and brought the tally to 5. I had hopes for a GM contact but none were active. Best DX (nearly) was G4EAT at 302km. We heard each other but did not manage a contact.

Towards the end of my time on the hill GD0EMG was sending a serial number of 37 - quite outstanding for 2 hours on 10GHz.

Imgur
Imgur

73

Richard
G3CWI

PS I must commend 10GHz operating. It requires a completely different skill-set to HF/VHF and thus is a great challenge (rather more so than buying a 23cm FM handy!).

Congratulations on qualifying for the SOTA point all on 10GHz. Pity you had already done NW-053 this year, so the point was not up for grabs anyway!

Tom MR1EYP

In reply to M1EYP:

… that was not the point!

Tell me about it…

In reply to G3CWI:

Well done on the activation Richard, especially the direct contacts. I managed that a few times on WBFM in the early 80`s, but that was when we used to scan the band for a tone. Extremely crude by comparison to modern SSB kit.

“I must commend 10GHz operating. It requires a completely different skill-set to HF/VHF and thus is a great challenge” - entirely agreed, but please speak to my bank manager for me and persuade him that it is okay for me to spend lots of money (relatively) for each QSO over the lifetime of the equipment. Besides carrying 10GHz kit up summits when there isn`t a contest on is very likely to result in nothing in return for the effort expended.

As for your sub-set comment: “(rather more so than buying a 23cm FM handy!)” - virtually no additional weight carried and cost per QSO considerably better than 10GHz. No wonder more of us do it!

73 and keep the 10GHz flag flying - I will join you when the transverters are around £150…

Gerald G4OIG

In reply to G3CWI:

Well done for having five 10GHz contacts, thereby qualifying the summit!

37 QSOs is an extremely good total for 10GHz, probably about my average number of QSOs for a SOTA activation that may be several hours longer & on several different bands.

It is certainly pushing the boundaries of SOTA as is any activation using any band out of the norm. I wonder how you are getting on with 500 KHz Richard? I did contemplate applying for an NOV but the detailed plans required for home operation put me off a little. I have this weekend modified a 50ft vertical to be resonant on 160m, & have had reports putting it several S-points better than my existing non-resonant horizontal loop @ 6m AGL. I am sure I could use a similar modification to make it resonant at 500 KHz, as during my first experiments it was originally resonant at 1325 KHz, a larger coil could easily lower that to 500 KHz. My Icom IC725 will produce a few milliwatts at that frequency, but I would probably aim to build a dedicated transmitter producing a few Watts.

In any case well done!

Best 73,

Mark G0VOF

In reply to G4OIG:

The database makes interesting reading. On 23cm the average activator has made 11.4 contacts. On 10GHz the average activator has made 27.3 contacts thus on your price per qso basis it is worth paying quite a premium for 10GHz. Of course also on that basis it would imply that only a Rockmite or similar is cost effective!

The point that I am trying to make is that 23cm handies are exceedingly poor performers and give a falsely negative impression of the potential of the microwave bands. Thats a pity as it simply reinforces the popular sterotypes of the microwave bands i.e. that they are line-of-sight and only good over short distances.

It would be interesting to compare the total QSO kilometres for each band (23cm and 3cm). I suspect that 10GHz would be way out in front! Perhaps the Summitsbase News Team will do this in a spare moment?

73

Richard
G3CWI

In reply to G3CWI:

On 23cm the average activator has made 11.4 contacts. On 10GHz the average activator has made 27.3 contacts thus on your price per qso basis it is worth paying quite a premium for 10GHz.

Well, having made 23cm QSOs from 61 summits out of the 225 summits that I have activated with the benefit of a 23cm rig (though not always taken), it would appear that I am not Mr Average. :slight_smile:

The point that I am trying to make is that 23cm handies are exceedingly poor performers and give a falsely negative impression of the potential of the microwave bands.

I cannot entirely agree with that point Richard. Don`t blame the radio, blame the operator. I use my 23cms handheld (280mW output) with a decent antenna and have had some good results with it. You get out only what you put in. Since it requires a lot of effort to operate 3cms even at a basic level, then hopefully you should get a lot out of it - if not, I would ask what are you doing it for!

73, Gerald G4OIG

EDIT: currently the actual figures are 61 summits with QSOs on 23cm, 164 summits with no QSOs, 105 summits no 23cm equipment, 7 summits 23cm equipment not carried.

In reply to G4OIG:

I never considered you as average Gerry! But equally I would not have considered labelling most of my SOTA mates as poor operators…

Regarding 10GHz - I would only do it if it was fun. Its a hobby after all. Mind you, thinking back on some activations I notice a phase delay between the activation and the feeling of fun. I can well recall a few that did not seem like fun at the time. In fact several were quite scary…

73

Richard
G3CWI

In reply to G3CWI:

Yes, 10GHz is undeniably good fun and I was well hooked along with Dave G8EXL (now G4OIH) in the early 80s. If there was still an interest in WBFM I would have a go from the summits, but I cant warrant the expenditure on a nice shiny transverter for the band at present. Maybe if I win the Lottery - but someone has to buy me a ticket first! :slight_smile:

As for activations not being fun, I can`t say that has ever really happened to me despite being thoroughly soaked on several occasions. I suppose being with Paul takes the edge off the worry, even in dire weather conditions - as they say, a problem shared is a problem halved.

73, Gerald G4OIG

In reply to G4OIG:
I have been relatively Active on 23cm FM recently! I must admit that the contacts are rather few and far between! However in terms of the performance, what QSOs I have had, have been very good IMHO!

The key to the band is not the rig or the power, but the Antenna! Rubber ducks are a waste of time, however Like Gerald I ensure that I take a decent antenna with me! 11 elements of Yagi is sufficient and lightweight enough for SOTA!

I have been out during the 23cm Contests! The beauty of these is that they allow you to test your systems! Although not a massive contester, I have very much enjoyed these sessions on 1296MHz! Equally with my 10 watts and 16 ele on SSB I have worked Newcastle upon Tyne, Ispwich, Isle of Man and PA Land all from WB-005 Carpark!

As soon as Yaesu make an 817 with 23cm SSB I wont be rushing out to take transverters etc! 23cm FM is good and light!

73

Knickers to all this HF send it up and splurt it everywhere! (Unless its P100 Hills)

Newly Hardened Class B - G8XYJ!!! Matt

Congratulations Matt on passing your full licence exam and getting your Dad`s class B callsign.

Jimmy M®3EYP

In reply to M3EYP:
Cheers Jimmy! When is the 2E0 being taken??

In reply to G8XYJ:

Now, that callsign had me very confused for a moment Matt :wink:

There is nothing wrong with HF “send it up & splurt it everywhere”, that is how the ionosphere works, it is always a gamble. Sometimes it works, & sometimes it doesn`t.

It is still much more reliable at the bottom of valleys, or on hemmed in summits IMHO.

Once again congratulations & best 73,

Mark G0VOF

Hi Matt,

I`m not sure yet when I will be doing my intermediate course. I will not be doing the course just yet as I have my A - Level exams coming up in June. I might do my intermediate course in September, but that will depending how much college work I will have to do. I hope to do my intermediate course at some point in the future and I hope get the call sign 2E0EYP. I wonder why you decided to have G8XYJ as your full licence call sign and not M0XTL?

Jimmy M®3EYP

In reply to M3EYP:
I wonder why you decided to have G8XYJ as your full licence call sign and not M0XTL?

Main reason was that like yourself I wanted to have something related to my Dad! His Class B call in 1980 was G8XYJ, he passed the Morse in 1982 to get G4OYX, So dropped the B callsign. Funny thing is he passed the Morse at 17WPM and was fairly competent. However once he passed he never had a QSO using the mode - For him it was purely an exercise to get on Shortwave Phone!

For me there is obvious sentimental reasons for the callsign but also I really like G calls more then M calls! Nothing wrong with M at all, It is just my opinion!

M0XTL was the backup choice if the G8 was not allowed!

Good luck with A-Level and Intermediate

I agree Mark with HF - My two HuMP activations on 40m recently have been alot of fun. I was just taking full advantage of the the G8 Call HI HI!!!

73

Matt G8XYJ!!! Hijacking to the max!!!

Hi Matt,

Thank you for your good luck comment.

Jimmy M®3EYP

Now that G4OYX callsign does ring a bell. I reckon I have got one or two broadcast station QSLs signed by your Dad! Just had a quick look in my files and found some engineering information for Sunshine 855, Ludlow from back in 1993, on which your Dad has added a handwritten letter to me. Think his name and call appears on another QSL letter from a different station too.

Furthermore, I see that I worked the both of you from Callow Hill G/WB-015 back in 2003: http://tomread.co.uk/callow_hill_2003.htm

73, Tom MR1EYP (for one more day)

In reply to M1EYP:
I do recall the Callow Hill QSOs as well as View Edge! 2003 seems a long time ago now!

Dad did set up the TXs for Sunshine 855 when the Valve TXs were in use - Unfortunately they have gone to boring Solid State and he is no longer involved!

The days of money in commercial radio seems far away now, damn these mediums such as internet! It seems we are going backward! Phones over Wireless networks and TV streamed through the web on Fibres! RF all the way I say! However Band two would be a welcome addition to the amateur bands!

Hijack to the upmost point

73

http://tomread.co.uk/long_mynd_-_pole_bank_2003.htm

…shows that I also worked you both from WB-005 in 2003, and that I had a chat with your Dad about the QSL cards and letters he had sent me in my broadcast SWL days.

Anyway, enough of this blatant hijacking. Back to microwave - I am hungry…

Tom MR1EYP