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DB5SB and DL2AJB on DM/NS-001

Lutz, DL3SBA gave me a hint, that I just posted this thread for “Germans” (german language) only. So I decided to post it again. If you’ve already read it, sorry for double-post.


Last week, me (Sebastian, DB5SB) and Jens (DL2AJB) decided, that today (fr, 29th oct 2010) would be a nice day to drive the 130km to Braunlage and walk the way up to the summit. Jens decided to do some CW on 30m and I, as usual, did SSB on 40m. I picked up Jens (and his parents who decided that the weather would be nice for a walk) at 06:00z and we started the ride. We arrived at the parking place around 8:30z, where Rico (DG8OBS), our “tourguide” was already waiting, and started the walk up to the summit. The way up (bit more than 2km, 450 height meters) is a ski slope in winter time, so the hike wasn’t that easy. (Especially not by carrying a battery with 5kg, a transceiver with 5kg, antennas, material, drinks, warm clothing, gps and stuff :slight_smile: )After 45min, we arrived at the summit (I was nearly wiped out) and started to install our dipoles and transceivers. The wx conditions were ok. The hike was quite foggy but as soon as we got to the top of the mountain, the sun broke through the sky. Temperatures around 3°C and some wind. As I turned my tansceiver (FT857) to 7.115MHz I suddenly found out that I never unlocked it to use 7.100-7.200MHz, which is usually bad. I turned down and found a free frequency at 7.094MHz. Sorry for that… I’m not using this transceiver for HF in my shack, so I completely forgot about that fact. After starting calling “CQ SOTA”, the pile-up began. I tried to make as much QSOs as possible to satisfy everybodys needs. About half an hour later my fingers began to freeze and I had to make a short break, eating something and warming my poor fingers :slight_smile: . I worked the pile-up for another 20 minutes until it reached an end. I wanted to do another break but the wind got heavier (we believed only near our antennas, not elsewhere) and we started freezing. So we decided (Jens after about 30 QSOs in CW/30m and me after about 70QSOs on SSB/40m) to deinstall the antennas and pack everything back into out bags. We then went into a smal restaurant near a ski jumping installation and had some lunch and a warm drink. Half an hour later we started our walk back. We decided to use another way, passed the ski jumping area and then went down another steep ski slope. we arived at the car, packed everything together and had another 2 hour drive home.
Thanks to everyone who called. Was a nice day. 73 de DB5SB et DL2AJB.

One Hint: I know there was a big pile-up. I’m usually on the summit carrying a battery with a capacity of 12Ah. So, using my FT857 I’m able do work for about 90minutes. Enough time for everyone. And I’m trying to answer everybody who calls. But this is nearly impossible when people starting to shout their callsign while I’m still in a QSO. Even more distracting are people who tune their antenna right on the QRG. In some areas I’m wearing headphones to keep the “Noise Level” (I’m producing) low. Believe me, this tone right in the ears hurts! And when I’m saying “only 9A”, I’m working only 9A and no one else. So, be patient. If you heared me with my 20W and my simple dipole not higher than 2 meters over ground, you can be sure, I heard you! And I will work you. Thanks. DB5SB (already planning the next activations)

Thanks for that activation, and the report. 73 – Rick M6LEP