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APRS and SOTA

The way I choosed to see, in real time, APRS stations on Google Earth .

  1. Go on the URL :

http://www.google.fr/url?sa=t&source=web&ct=res&cd=1&url=http%3A%2F%2Faprs.fi%2F&ei=41nPSK6YOJLO0gW5hvC6BA&usg=AFQjCNGrOrw0anmKbMwB5eD1VOrx5qhNFg&sig2=cJU5ekZ0b_NI-yeIwK-sFA

  1. Write your call sign in the window to be connected on Google Map

  2. once connected, please, click on “Google Earth KML ?” on the right side vertical pannel.

  3. You may now locate in real time any mobile or static station on the globe .

5.Don’t forget to record this favourite location before closing Google earth

Have fun with climbing Sota APRS friends…
73
Mike

In reply to F6GEO:

My APRS activity:
S57D…home QTH of Sabina, S57BNX and Milos, S57D
S57D-9…car
S57D-6…WX station
S57D-1…QRL

73, Milos S57D

In reply to F6GEO:
Salut Michel,

Le lien que j’ai mis sur le reflector d’hier montre les photos google Earth en passant par http://aprs.fi/
73 QRO
Alain

It will never catch on!

In reply to GW7AAV:

Why Steve ? can ou explain ?

73 Alain F6ENO

In reply to F6ENO:
Oui Alain,j"ai vu et voulais simplement donner la méthode à suivre pour que chacun parvienne à ce résultat hi !!

Yes, Alan,I saw your post, but wanted to show to anyone how it is possible to spot hamradio stations on Google Earth.

michel

In reply to S57D:
hello Milos.
very funny to see you on my map hi!!
Mike

In reply to F6ENO:

Hi Alain, just my observation and opinion, but I will explain…

Lots of us find the whole idea that anyone can know where you are at any time somewhat worrying. In today’s society almost everyone can be tracked by their mobile telephone, use of credit cards and the ever present security cameras. Those systems of tracking are pretty much limited to the security services, but the idea that anyone such as a thief can via the Internet know you are away from home and far enough away to not be back soon is not a good one.

As a safety system maybe APRS is a good idea for SOTA activators, but I carry all my battery power on to the hills for the purpose of activating and using half my capacity on the way up to power the beacon seems self defeating.

The main reason I do not believe APRS will ever be mainstream is the cost. I personally have over 25 transceivers between those in the shack, the ones in my vehicles and the ones I take up the hills and as far as I know only one is APRS compatible and that is a mobile rig that I use in the shack for 70cm FM. Most radio amateurs I know are not going to run out and buy new kit just so everyone else knows where they are. I also own three SatNav and two GPS units none of which has any facility to be linked with a radio that I know of. Replacing these would be as expensive as replacing the radios.

Looking at the APRS mapping site yesterday I could see two stations within fifty miles of my QTH, both fixed stations but no mobiles. Surely the main advantage of APRS is that you know when a mobile station is in range? but no mobiles. Bearing in mind there are major cities such as Liverpool, Manchester, Chester and Wrexham in that catchment area and there are more than twenty radio clubs I could list, it does not appear to be catching on here.

Basically I believe there is limited appeal and limited interest in this technology from an amateur stand point and that it will soon be superseded by newer technologies with more useful functionality. It is still fun to watch an ascent via the Internet in this way but I will not be investing in the ability to be tracked.

Remember just because someone is paranoid does not mean someone is not out to get them. ;0)

Best regards Steve GW7AAV 73

In reply to GW7AAV:
Hi Steve,

Thank you for this detailed answer. I think you are 100% right.

Personaly, I was only thinking about securty.
You kown, Odile, my wife is always anxious when I am alone on montains.
Of course, I carry my celular phone and my radio, but women are women…

Best 73 and hope to see you fromm summits soon (without APRS for now)
Alain

In reply to GW7AAV:

You are speaking for me, too, Steve!

For my part I will never use Satnav in the hills, I would rather trust to my hard-earned skills with map and compass than to a gadget that might let me down without warning! I’m not a Luddite, I’m just cautious!

73

Brian G8ADD

In reply to F6GEO:

Oui Alain,j"ai vu et voulais simplement donner la méthode à
suivre pour que chacun parvienne à ce résultat hi !!

OK Michel, c’est impec.

73 Alain

In reply to F6GEO:

In reply to S57D:
hello Milos.
very funny to see you on my map hi!!
Mike

Big brother is watching me all the time :-)))

73, Milos S57D

In reply to G8ADD:

I’m with you and Steve Brian, paper maps and a mechanical compass don’t go short circuit, although I think APRS would have been interesting on some of the multiple summit activation expeditions such as both of the 24/24 challenges, it would have been useful for the chasers to track the movements of both teams and monitor their progress as they activated each summit.

73
Barry 2E0PXW

In reply to 2E0PXW:

LOL, good shout Baz, it would have been very interesting !!

Lee

I am also a map and compass person on the hills. There have been two occasions in my walking where a GPS unit would have been useful. These were both where I had lost my bearings, was in almost zero visibility and a great big bubble appeared in my compass!

Even in those situations though, I rather enjoyed the challenge to get myself out of those situations, using calm logical thought and teamwork with Jimmy.

Which reminds me, my compass has a big bubble in it! I have had three consectuive Silva compasses where this has happened. Each has lasted less than two years (mnd you that’s about 400 expeditions!). Does anyone have a recommendation for a long-lasting, robust and reliable compass?

Thanks,

Tom M1EYP

In reply to M1EYP:

Which reminds me, my compass has a big bubble in it! I have had three
consectuive Silva compasses where this has happened. Each has lasted
less than two years (mnd you that’s about 400 expeditions!). Does
anyone have a recommendation for a long-lasting, robust and reliable
compass?

My Silva compass has a bubble in the fluid. What should I do?

We intend that our compasses are free of bubbles; however, if a small bubble forms in the liquid-filled capsule, it has no influence on the accuracy of the compass. Its appearance and disappearance are due to changes in temperature and atmospheric pressure. If a bubble larger than 1/4" in diameter appears, it is probably the result of a leaking capsule, usually caused by some form of shock damage, and the capsule will have to be replaced. In that case, just call our customer satisfaction department for a return authorization number and shipping address. From the U.S.A, call 1-800-572-8822 between 8 am-6 pm, eastern time. From Canada, call 1-800-263-6390.

Finding the UK/EU number to call is left as an exercise for the reader! :slight_smile:

Andy
MM0FMF

In reply to M1EYP:

Does anyone have a recommendation for a long-lasting, robust and reliable
compass?

Hi Tom,

Mine is a Geonaute C330; never had a problem with it. But don’t know if it exists in GB. http://www.geonaute.com/FR/c-300-4148895/

I have always a 1:25000 map, with my route drawn on it, and a Magellan GPS (Explorist 500) with the same route inside. So I can often know if I am on the right way, even in fog.
To draw my route, and upload it in the GPS, I use Carto Explorer soft.
http://www.bayo.com/cartographie/index.php?prod=2

Best 73
Alain

PS: I could hear you this morning on 80m CW but 2 strong stations came to talk over on your QRG… and without asking QRL, of course…

In reply to M1EYP:

Tom, my compass is a Silva type 3 which has been in use for over 30 years without problems, still with its original plastic wallet. It may eventually need retiring due to the plastic getting scuffed but I suspect it will outlast me!

73

Brian GADD

In reply to M1EYP:

I just replaced my Silva compass because it had flipped so North was the black end and South the red which might have been a problem if someone else was using it to navigate with. This may have been due to leaving it in a vertical position in the ruck sack next to the metal case of the rig for long periods of time (months). It was the first compass I ever bought and was over 35 years old. The oil in the capsule had turned a tan colour but it had no bubbles. I would say that was a “long-lasting, robust and reliable compass”, but maybe they don’t make them like they used to?

73 Steve GW7AAV

In reply to GW7AAV:

Save the old one, Steve, they say the magnetic poles are about to flip!

73

Brian G8ADD