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Questions about the rules

In reply to G8ADD:
Brian, I am not saying YOU operate like that, and apologies if it came accross that way, that was not my intent, but it is your rule and thats the reason the question was thrown your way.
The spot was there until yesterday evening, here are the details;

Mon 20:16 DK3WM/P on DM/HE-066 7.030 cw
In abt. 12h i hpe iam QRV (Posted by DK3WM)

It has now been conveniently deleted, and not a corrected error, as it stood until after the activation !

Anyhow it doesnt matter now, but if as you say it was missed then surely there should be a back up moderator to “watch your back” so to speak, and police the system ?? There always seems to be someone there when unacceptable comments are made ??!!

Regards
Lee

In reply to LA5SAA:

The rules don’t specify what constitutes ‘the final ascent’. However, I personally would consider it equal to the prominence requirement used in the association.

Thus, taking the Snowdon Mountain Railway to the top, 20m below the summit, would not be a valid SOTA. However, taking it to Clogwyn, 306m below the summit, and walking from there would be valid (though lazy :stuck_out_tongue: )

That rule probably breaks for some summits though. Isn’t there one in Yorkshire which is just the highest point of a moor or something?

If they’re sea islands, then height equals prominence (Aside: They’re likely iota as well, so bear that in mind). If they’re lake or river islands, it’s a bit more complicated, but I reckon you should be fine.

The point could also be made that the water crossing is not ‘ascent’ :wink:

Well that is, and can only be a personal view. As you say, there isn’t a specification in the rules for this. I have done loads of activations in England where the walk from the logical parking spot has involved less than 150m of ascent. You would have to really contrive a route on some G summits in order to ensure at least 150m vertical of person powered final ascent.

On the other hand, there are also some superb circular routes (some multi-day) in the Lakes (and elsewhere) that avoid roads completely, but take in several SOTA summits.

Tom M1EYP

In reply to M0FFX:

The rules don’t specify what constitutes ‘the final ascent’. However,
I personally would consider it equal to the prominence requirement
used in the association.

Italian “SOTA” rules specifies a 45 min walk. But how can we know if
an activator walks 45min or a 100 / 150m prominence ?

73 Alain

In reply to F6ENO:

We don’t, Alain. The more that is said on the subject, the slippier it gets. SOTA is, however, committed to catering for a wide range of capabilities. The summits just in the UK range from one that (to the best of my knowledge) can only be activated from a roadside layby, to one that can only be activated using ropes and the other equipment of the rock climber. This in my opinion is one of the strengths of the program. The more we try and tie the program down with specifications, the more we reduce the width of its appeal. We are free to apply self-imposed criteria if it increases our enjoyment, but leaving the official rules vague guarantees breadth of appeal.

73

Brian G8ADD

In reply to G8ADD:

We are free to apply self-imposed criteria if it increases our enjoyment,
but leaving the official rules vague guarantees breadth of appeal.

OK Brian, I understand that with actual rules, everybody can find his own pleasure.
That’s fine.

73 Alain