Ok - so what is it?

I’ve made THIS (picture from Bardon Hill G/CE-004):

I’ll send a prize to the first person who posts what it is! :slight_smile:

Rob G7LAS

In reply to G7LAS:
Looks like a 2 element 2meter moxon to me…

In reply to VK3XL:

Nope :slight_smile:

Moxon’s have gaps and stuff.

In reply to G7LAS:

2 metre quadruple quad antenna? Looks good.

How did it perform compared to your Slim Jim,
and how small does it fold down for transport?

73, John M0VCM

In reply to G7LAS:

  1. That’s an error.

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In reply to M0VCM:

Two element skeleton slot?

73

Brian G8ADD

In reply to M0VCM:

In reply to G7LAS:

2 metre quadruple quad antenna? Looks good.

How did it perform compared to your Slim Jim,
and how small does it fold down for transport?

73, John M0VCM

Yeah John… that’s 100% what it is!

I use it for 2m SSB so it’s horizontally polarised in the photo. It wipes the floor with my slimjim but then it’s a different kettle of fish.

“> and how small does it fold down for transport?”… no, just no! But that’s mostly my bad design. I’m thinking about ways to make it better for transporting.

Works a treat though on the summits… wait for it, excellent gain and not even very directional!

R

In reply to G7LAS:

Richard GW0VMW has a design for a fold up quadruple quad antenna for 70cms, I`m sure it can easily be scaled up for 2m.

The design is on the SOTA Wales site at :-

http://sotawales.co.uk/

In reply to G7LAS:

Must have been fun carrying that up Bardon Hill :slight_smile:

Gerald G4OIG made a similar antenna for 23cm which
required some precision assembly, but will obviously
be more portable! Maybe the larger dimensions for 2m
will make partial assembly on a summit more feasible.

73, John M0VCM

In reply to G7LAS:

Roger MW0IDX’s 70cms version collapses to a small size. You should be able to do a mark 2 version that does likewise.

excellent gain and not even very directional!

You seem to have come up with a “Partridge Electronics” definition of gain! :slight_smile:

It should have 23dBd front to back ratio. Or about 4 S-points.

Andy
MM0FMF

In reply to MM0FMF:

In reply to G7LAS:

You seem to have come up with a “Partridge Electronics” definition of
gain! :slight_smile:

It should have 23dBd front to back ratio. Or about 4 S-points.

Andy
MM0FMF
It has a very tight lobe in the vertical plane Andy, hence wide in the horizontal and ‘higher than expected gain’ (considering the low directional characteristics)

F/b is a ratio, so I’m confused by your use of dBd. Also, 4 s points has further added to my confusion as I thought an s point was circa 3db.

Yours, Confused in South Derbyshire.

In reply to G7LAS:

When first defined, an S-point was six dB, this has been progressively reduced by Japanese manufacturers to the point where recent offerings have had S-points as low as 2 dB thus enabling operators to give exaggerated signal reports!

73

Brian G8ADD

In reply to G7LAS:
1 S point is usually 6db as far as I know…

In reply to VK3XL:

Thanks chaps… I’ve learnt something today :0))

Yours, Less Confused in South Derbyshire.

In reply to G7LAS:

S point is normally 6dB. So 23dB (not dBd sorry!) is about 4 S points.

If you don’t try these things you never find out whether they work for what you want. For the size and time to setup, is it better than a 5 ele Yagi? If it is then it’s a winner. ISTR an advantage of quad antennas is they are more tolerant of constructional tolerances than Yagis. Not an issue at 2m normally.

The fun in these things for me is the actual “doing” of making and using something. If it turns out to be a pig in a poke I still had the fun of trying it all out.

Andy
MM0FMF

In reply to MM0FMF:

In reply to G7LAS:

S point is normally 6dB. So 23dB (not dBd sorry!) is about 4 S points.

If you don’t try these things you never find out whether they work for
what you want. For the size and time to setup, is it better than a 5
ele Yagi?

Cheers Andy. Better? Well - that’s an interesting term. It’s certainly has different characteristics. I have a 10m vertical and 10m horizontal dipole at home and the 10m vertical is “better” (higher signals on the s meter on rx). But due to noise, the horizontal dipole is actually capable of resolving more signals. Then there’s the argument of potentially using one for receive and the other for transmitting… the list goes on! Which is better??? Hmmmm…

The fun in these things for me is the actual “doing” of making and
using something. If it turns out to be a pig in a poke I still had the
fun of trying it all out.

Andy
MM0FMF

Totally agree. I loved making it. I often find I need to make something once and then make it again in order to get it right. Only once the thing has fallen off the pole and smashed into a thousand pieces do I think there might be something wrong with my implementation! :slight_smile: It’s then I improve on virtually everything and end up with something usable.

There will be a mk2 coming round sometime. I hope to use it in the backpackers contest later this year and knock Rhys off the top of Cadair Berwyn with it (only joking of-course!)

Rob

In reply to G1INK:

In reply to G7LAS:

Richard GW0VMW has a design for a fold up quadruple quad antenna for
70cms, I`m sure it can easily be scaled up for 2m.

The design is on the SOTA Wales site at :-

http://sotawales.co.uk/

It’s actually very similar design to that Steve.

In reply to G7LAS:
Having looked at the website and the article on the antenna, I would be interested in an electrical diagram. The feed is illustrated but I was unable to see where the feed is actually connected. Is there a more detailed diagram that distinguishes between conductors and insulators?
Andrew
vk1da