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Help with correct frrequency

Ok don’t laugh, where do I call on 2 metre fm voice. Tried yesterday after cw with no success. Only used the mike a few times in 25 years and I find it as hard as others find cw . I looked on the RSGB web site but still not sure and Id like to give a few points on fm.

73’s Mike G0HIO

In reply to G0HIO:

Calling freq 145.500. QSY after establishing contact. Channel spacing is 12.5kHz but most people still use 25kHz spacings.

73

Richard
G3CWI

In reply to G0HIO:

Hi Mike

The 2m-fm calling channel is 145.500, chasers will monitor there, you should call there then qsy to a clear frequency.

Good luck on 2m-fm Mike.

73
Mike GW0DSP

In reply to G0HIO:

Hi Mike, take a look at the new bandplan at
http://www.rsgb.org/spectrumforum/bandplans/2009/rsgb_bandplan_2009.pdf
if you haven’t already done so.

Generally from my experience it is best to call on 145.500 MHz to establish contact then move away to another quiet simplex channel. I’m sure the other party to the QSO could guide you to a suitable frequency if you are not too sure.

73 Colin

In reply to G0HIO:

You can find the bandplans on the RSGB website at http://www.rsgb.org/spectrumforum/bandplans/ and there is both an html version to view online and a pdf you can download.

The FM calling frequency is 145.500MHz.

However, in the Edinburgh area FM is known as “feeble mode” and you would call on 145.800MHz AM irrespective of any bandplans (or satellites in range)! :wink:

Andy
MM0FMF

Ok thanks everyone, I was close with 145.050 ha. May try it on kinder scout tomorrow.
73’s Mike

In reply to G0HIO:

Ok thanks everyone, I was close with 145.050 ha. May try it on kinder
scout tomorrow.
73’s Mike

145.050 is the input frequency for the GB3MN repeater Mike.

Anyway you are sorted now, have some fun on 2m.

73
Mike GW0DSP

In reply to MM0FMF:

However, in the Edinburgh area FM is known as "feeble mode"
and you would call on 145.800MHz AM irrespective of any bandplans (or
satellites in range)! :wink:

Aha, so that’s how some of those well hidden SS summits are qualified so easily Andy. I must remember that when I’m next up there. Horizontal or vertical polarisation and are they likely to speak to a sassenach?

73, Gerald

In reply to G4OIG:

The pro AM on .8 group would welcome you with open arms and the anti .8 group will complain to OFCOM. It depends on who hears you.

You could, of course, use AM on .8 and pretend to be the ISS which will confound both groups! :wink:

Andy
MM0FMF

In reply to MM0FMF:

Hmmm, seems I’ll have to rub my FT-243 crystal with a pencil to move it down to 145.795MHz. That should keep me “legal” and confound both groups! Better still, maybe I’ll use DSB and that will ensure they’ll all be off down the pub, one lot unhappy that there’s an awful racket on “their” frequency and the other lot pleased that an indecipherable noise has jammed their opponents!

73, Gerald

Hmmm, 2m AM, that sounds interesting. I seem to vaguely recall that some settings adjustments are required to use the FT-817 on AM. Can anyone advise?

Tom M1EYP

In reply to M1EYP:

some settings adjustments are required to use the FT-817 on AM

Yes, you have to press the mode button until it says AM!

It seems the stock AM settings sound horrible, you need to tweek the AM_CAR and AM_MIC settings to get an improvement.

Andy
MM0FMF

In reply to M1EYP:

You will need a decent antenna Tom to enable operations on the 817 using AM.

Regards

Lee

Only use decent antennae with the 817 Lee, NP.

Thanks for the advice though.

Tom M1EYP

What polarisation do people use on AM?

73

Richard
G3CWI

In reply to G3CWI:

Hi Richard,

What polarisation do people use on AM?

I’m sure you know, but here goes - History Lesson for the younger generation:

The polarisation for AM used to be horizontal polarisation as the mode was the predecessor of SSB on 2m. I remember working into OH on the mode and later the change over to SSB with the advent of the ubiquitous Liner 2. The calling frequency was on 145.410MHz, if I remember correctly. I used to call SSB stations with my AM rig netted on, often to be told that my carrier suppression had gone haywire. Eventually I persuaded the XYL to let me purchase a Trio TR7010 in 1976 which is still in use today.

Vertical polarisation came in with FM (which quickly became the preferred mode for mobile), largely because the antennae were simpler to mount on the vehicle and didn’t look like something from Mars.

In the case of the Edinburgh AM group, I would imagine that being a local group where signals will be strong between stations, simplicity will be the order of the day and verticals will be used. I could be wrong as it begs the question, where have all those halos gone? Come to that, where have all those Liner 2’s gone?

73, Gerald

In reply to G4OIG:

I don’t know about Liner-2s, Gerald, but a couple of years ago there was a Liner-430 at a local rally going for £30 - a bargain if ever I saw one, but someone else snapped it up!

I remember asking Tom, G3BA why 145.41 was the calling frequency for SSB and he said it was a palindrome and therefore easy to remember!

73

Brian G8ADD

In reply to G4OIG:

Thanks Gerry. A long response - but not actually an answer!

The question relates to current usage.

73

Richard
G3CWI

In reply to G3CWI:

Well, since AM is likely to be a localised “speciality”, I would expect the answer for any group to be much along the lines that I surmised for the Edinburgh group. Verticals double for FM use, are easier to obtain and are more aesthetically low profile than a halo or similar horizontally polarised antenna.

If I get up into the SS’s this May, I’ll give it a go and let you know the outcome.

73, Gerald

In reply to G8ADD:

Hi Brian,

The Liner 430 - the biggest regret of my amateur radio life is that I sold mine. I modified it and put a Gasfet in the front end. It was a great rig, nothing at all like the Liner 2.

£30… now I’m going to a dark room to cry!

73, Gerald