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60 metres

Hi all

We are not too far away from the end of the existing NoV for 5 Mhz. Scheduled to end on the 30th June this year (2010).

I’ve been unable to find any information on an extension to the “experiment” on any web based source.

It seems that there is next to no information on whether we will be able to reapply for an extended NoV (for the current channels), or be allowed a full allocation to the band, or if we will loose a very interesting and useful part of the spectrum.

Unless someone knows different…

Carolyn (G6WRW)

In reply to G6WRW:
According to recent posts on the 5 megs group and recent overheard discussions negotiations are currently in progress. Keep your fingers (and toes) crossed!

73

Brian G8ADD

In reply to G6WRW:

or if we will loose a very interesting and useful part of the spectrum.

Even if we don’t loose it, the potential loss is a good enough reason to improve your CW to the point you can have QSOs with the chasers on 40/30m.

Andy
MM0FMF

The very reason I decided to learn it Andy. (Well, that, and a desire to stop being goaded about it in the pub by a certain local chap).

If 5MHz is extended, will it still be under NoV terms, or will it become a generally available amateur band?

Tom M1EYP

In reply to M1EYP:

If 5MHz is extended

Until you see an official announcement saying what is happening anything anyone tells you is mere conjecture.

Andy
MM0FMF

In reply to MM0FMF:

At the moment we don’t even know what is being asked for, obviously something along the lines of the LA model would be ideal though I would settle for what we have now. There is NO substitute for 5 megs, CW on 40/30 is irrelevant, I’m afraid!

73

Brian G8ADD

In reply to G8ADD:

CW on 40/30 is irrelevant

Your loss not mine :wink:

My awful CW skills have saved me on at least 4 activations (Trahenna Hill, Cruach Ardrain, Beinn Stacach, Law Kneiss) which otherwise would have been unsuccessful. I’m sure there’s more that I can’t recall right now.

I’d really, really miss 60m, but it wouldn’t be the end of the world for me.

Andy
MM0FMF

In reply to MM0FMF:
Andy when you say awful CW skills just how awful do you mean? Sean M0GIA

In reply to MM0FMF:

You missed the point, Andy, it isn’t a matter of loving/hating CW! 60 is giving good UK coverage at times when 80 is poor due to D-layer absorbtion and 40 is too long for UK coverage, it is also a quirky band with many interesting tricks such as anisotropic propagation during Es episodes, and in the wee sma’ hoors it gives some grand DX opportunities. I love the band and if we lost it I would lose a part of my enthusiasm for ham radio. Not that I think there is much chance of losing it but you never know, the authorities are quite capable of being arbitary over things like that.

73

Brian G8ADD

In reply to M0GIA:

You should ask people who’ve worked me, I might give a self-flattering answer!

Sending is no problem upto 14wpm using the Palm Paddle unless my fingers are really cold. I’ve not tried to send faster because that way exceeds the speed I can receive at.

I suppose my receive speed is about 8wpm. I have no problem spotting callsigns and reports etc. The problem comes when I get something I don’t expect, panic and realise I’ve missed a load of characters and start worrying about what I’ve missed. 8wpm is also hard for people to slow down to when they’re used to going faster. I’m probably able to copy the characters at 14wpm but I still need a gap between characters.

The key is practice and I don’t. Lazyness is part of the problem and often when I’m in the mood to practice I’ve brought home work to do, just like tonight where I’ll be bashing away on the laptop for a 3 hours after I’ve eaten something :frowning:

Andy
MM0FMF

In reply to MM0FMF:
improve your CW to the point you can have QSOs with the chasers on 40/30m.

If you enjoy playing in a bearpit with alligators and machine-gunners, 'cos that’s what SOTA CW sounds like to me.

Dave, G6DTN

In reply to MM0FMF:
I’m surprised there isn’t much CW SOTA on 60m.
It seems an ideal band to practice on before entering the lions den of 40m.

Roger G4OWG

In reply to M0DFA:

I’ve had a few callers who don’t understand what “PSE QRS” means. But to be honest just about everyone who calls me (normally from DL/HB9/LX) is so keen to get a GM summit they do their best to accomodate my poor RX skills. I really appreciate them slowing down and repeating their call for me.

Much better with a narrow CW filter than before! (nudge, nudge, wink, wink!)

Andy
MM0FMF

Problems are memorable, but few and far between! One of my earliest CW activations, on The Cloud G/SP-015 in 2007, included a chaser that wouldn’t QRS despite several requests. The result was that he wasn’t in the log! On Trostan GI/AH-001 in 2008, I endured an “alligatorfest” which was unpleasantly coincidental with a heavy hailstorm. The result was that I went QRT!

But two problems in three years of pretty regular CW SOTA activating gives the truer impression of the standards. Everyone is kind, patient, pleasant, respectful, encouraging and appreciative of the activator.

I’ve been telling Sean M0GIA that SOTA CW activating is easier than SOTA CW chasing, because you’re in the chair dictating the protocol and rhythm of the operation. So hopefully we will soon have his first solo CW activations, and the latest newbie to SOTA CW.

Tom M1EYP

I agree with Roger that 60m CW is underused. It is an excellent place to hone your CW skills with pretty reliable signals and no QRM. However having said that, when I’ve used it I have only netted half a dozen callers at the most before the hordes descend after the move to 5.3985 SSB. :slight_smile:

As for Brian’s comments about UK coverage on 60m, actually the “need” for the frequency for inter UK coverage should diminish over the next few years as sunspots (hopefully) reappear. Reliable NVIS propagation for the UK using 40m should return as the F2 critical frequency will nudge towards 8-9 MHz during the day at the peak. However it doesn’t make 40m any less busy and that is at least one of the (current) benefits on 60m.

My 10 cents worth…

73 Marc G0AZS

In reply to G0AZS:
As long as the call signs are repeated and the speed is not crazy (10wpm with humane gaps) I reckon once the nerves settle I should be OK?

Keeping this thread on topic - is CW on 60m slower than other bands or am I reading into that the wrong way? Sean M0GIA

In reply to M0GIA:

…is CW on 60m slower than other bands or am I reading into that the wrong way?

The speed is whatever you dictate (as an activator). However I would agree that on average 40m does tend to run a bit faster than say 80m or 60m but that’s irrelevant… call at your own speed… It works.

73 Marc G0AZS

In reply to M0GIA:

Listen around 7.032MHz on a Saturday/Sunday afternoon using an SSB bandwidth. Then listen to all the 60m channels. Notice the difference? :wink:

It’s the sheer number of people using 40m that’s the issue. Anyway people will slow down if they want a contact with you. Well they do for me.

I’ll repeat what Roy G4SSH told me last year at Blackpool, “… just go on the air and call. People won’t care how bad your sending or receiving is because they want the points.” He was ever so right.

Anyway, what have you got to loose?

Andy
MM0FMF

In reply to MM0FMF:
Quote: I’ll repeat what Roy G4SSH told me last year at Blackpool, “… just go on the air and call. People won’t care how bad your sending or receiving is because they want the points.” He was ever so right.

Anyway, what have you got to loose?

Well when its put like that i suppose the only answer i could give is nowt! Sean M0GIA