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Stac Lee GM/SS-214


#1

Some of you might be interested in the following link with videos showing an ascent of one of the more “challenging” SOTA summits in the St. Kilda Group 20 years ago.

It might be a while before it’s activated!

73 Marc G0AZS


#2

In reply to G0AZS:
I find the report astounding. No responsible climber would climb through a nesting area during the breeding season.

73

Brian G8ADD


#3

In reply to G0AZS:
Are there youtube links to the video ? I think you have to be logged into the forum to see them.

Andrew
K1YMI


#4

In reply to K1YMI:

They are YouTube videos. The embedded video links appear for me and I’m not a member of that forum. If you are using a decent browser (Firefox?) then right-clicking the videos shows “Watch on YouTube” as an option.

But if your browser isn’t playing ball, try these:


Andy
MM0FMF


#5

In reply to G8ADD:

In reply to G0AZS:
I find the report astounding. No responsible climber would climb
through a nesting area during the breeding season.

73

Brian G8ADD

One of the climbers was the NTS warden. You’ve got to assume he knew what he was doing.

Andy
MM0FMF


#6

In reply to MM0FMF:
Thanks, I guess firefox was not playing ball as, it does not show the links. Maybe for some bizarre reason it’s geocoded.
Thanks for the yt links, I can see those :slight_smile:
That’s too steep an ascent for me!

Andrew


#7

In reply to MM0FMF:

In reply to G8ADD:
One of the climbers was the NTS warden. You’ve got to assume he knew
what he was doing.

Andy
MM0FMF

Andy, that is the worst part. The warden should know better. Guillemots and razorbills, for instance, build no nests, if panicked off their nest ledges the eggs can be dislodged and destroyed. Later in the season if the young are panicked they can fall, if the parent birds are frightened away for a while the young can be predated. There is no way of knowing at the outset that you can avoid the nests, you climb where the progression of holds takes you. In July or August it all goes quiet and you can climb where you like, there is no excuse earlier and it is in fact illegal as the nest sites of virtually all species except those classed as vermin are protected by law.

73

Brian G8ADD


#8

I would think this assent was not sanctioned by the NTS at the time, even 20 years ago , permit ion would be needed, and then only for research.

Try getting access granted from Scottish Natural Heritage today and see what the answer would be.

I had regular work at SNH HQ in Inverness for a few years and there was always regular exhibitions and photographs of St Kilda on display.

Alan
MM0XXP