Other SOTA sites: SOTAwatch | SOTA Home | Database | Video | Photos | Shop | Mapping | FAQs | Facebook | Contact SOTA

SOTA Plates


#1

OK, fess up. Who’s got SOTA?


#2

Dunno about S0TA, but my favourite, which I saw on a yellow Rolls-Royce in Britain nearly a half-century ago was OBO 110 X


#3

Saw one here recently which I like.
PB4 UGO

Very sage.

73
Ron
VK3AFW


#4

…and thymely!


#5

It’s actually used to be very common for Hams in the UK to wait until the right time comes around and then apply for their Call Sign as their car registration in the UK. My Brother Jim, has G 8 DCD. Not sure how that would work with 2E and M call signs though!

Ed.


#6

M1, M3, M5 and M6 calls might get something if they hunted, but G0, M0 and 2* calls might have to stretch things a bit. I suppose, if I could be bothered, and really wanted something approximating my call, I might find “MOL 3 P”, or perhaps “M 10 LEP” (and pretend the 1 was an I, and move over the Irish Sea)…

There are two or three G plates round here that look like callsigns but don’t appear to belong to Hams.


#7

I’ve never wanted a plate where the sequence is memorable. I’d much rather have something obscure and anonymous that nobody can easily recall when they want to report you and your driving to the feds.


#8

I was content with J 539 HAM. It was on a second-hand Fiesta that I bought years ago. I didn’t pay any extra for it. :grinning:

73,
Walt (G3NYY)


#9

The waiting for the right combination to come around meant my brother didn’t pay any extra as well - hey we’re not just Hams - were from Yorkshire as well! A very “cost concious” combination!

Now that the format of UK registrations have changed I guess the only way to get a G # AAA or M# ZZZ registration nowadays would be to buy an old car with it on and then transfer it over (but the burocrats charge an arm and a leg for that!).

Ed.


#10

With road rage occasionally being the fashion in California, I’ve been somewhat reluctant to provide an avenue via QRZ.com to my home address.

I’ll remain as anonymous as I can while driving.

Paul


#11

There are many available direct from DVLA - just go to http://dvlaregistrations.direct.gov.uk/search/ and you will find hundreds.


#12

Since with a zero and a Q in my call sign, there being no chance of a call sign plate, I settled for my fvaourite local summit. Tried to get the DVLA to allow me an extra zero but no chance.


#13

In the US, plates are issued by each state. Most states have special call sign plates. In California, I had to send my FCC license and wait six months. But it was free.

I guess I don’t have to tell you which car is mine.

wunder


#14

Report you to the FEDS?
Wait, we’re HAMS…we aspire to be law-abiding citizens, fully compliant, with noo need for anyone to EVER EVER EVER need to contact the FEDS because WE were out of line.
Correct? I mean, even after a few pints, we’d walk? ;-)!


#15

Unfortunately the car plates still adhere to the rules at the time of their original issue and certain letter combinations are not available, notably the middle letter in the suffix. In my particular, both “I” and “X” are unavailable, so no chance to own either.

Gerald G4OIiG / G8CXK

P.S. Something like XX 65 OTA would be okay for SOTA with a bit of manipulation of the spacing.


#16

Instant MOT fail. Well it is if you take it to a competent test station.


#17

SOTA is available as a valid plate here in NSW, Australia. Costs upwards from $180 depending on style then an annual fee that starts at $105.00.


#18

I guess I got lucky with mine. It seems like my wait was less than two months. I had to pay $20, however.


#19

I have seen RST 599C (old Invernessshire plate) but, currently here in Banff there is a driving school car which really improves confidence: PAN11C :slight_smile:


#20

The first time I saw the topic title I thought “what a good idea, it would go with the SOTA mug”! How disappointing…:grinning: