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SOTA for NOVICE Licenced


#1

Hi SOTA guys, please if you have the option, try activating sometime on following frequencies: 7.060-7.100MHz, 14.100-14.250MHz or 28.225-29.200MHz in phone,
so I (novice licence) can also try to earn some chaser points.
I’m always working QRP 5 Watts in phone, soon also in digimodes)
Wish you good luck with your activations and a safe trip home,
73’s 44’s de PD2PC

PLEASE RESPECT THE QRP FREQUENCIES ! qrprespect dot jimdo dot com <<<


#2

In reply to PD2PC:
Hello Patrick,

Are you saying that your PD2 licence limits you to certain frequencies?

If that’s the case if I’m on 40M I could possibly use 7.095MHz or there about’s. Not sure what to suggest on 20M - 14.118/218MHz - possibly?

73

Jack (;>J
GM4COX


#3

In reply to GM4COX:

Are you saying that your PD2 licence limits you to certain frequencies?

I’d thought that way of doing things was chiefly found over the Atlantic, so I went burrowing, and it seems the Netherlands works that way too. http://hamradio.nikhef.nl/veron/operate.htm says:

The “N” (novice) License permits access to the 2-metre and 70-centimetre and parts of the HF bands with a maximum of 25 watts peak envelope power. <<

The novice frequency allocations are at the end of the page here: http://hamradio.nikhef.nl/amrad/bple.htm

How many other countries in Europe allocate frequencies in similar fashion?

73, Rick M0LEP


#4

In reply to PD2PC:

Doesn’t the lack of activations on the frequencies you are allowed to use act as an incentive to upgrade?

Andy
MM0FMF


#5

In reply to MM0FMF:

I agree with this dr Andy, the Novice licence gives already a lot of possibilities, there must be a reason to upgrade!! I worked hard to get the HF license by learning CW. No fun for me, but I enjoy the license more now, not getting it for free, but achieve something. I think that is the hole idea of a N ( Novice ) license. With “N” you have enough frequency space to practice. I have seen enough amateurs who managed to get the “big” license without any previous education at school, just working hard to get there goal.

73 de Hans DL/PA3FYG/P


#6

In reply to MM0FMF:
Right you are, one day I will get my Full Licence
But in the mean time you could try and set that VFO knob in motion :wink:
Patrick PD2PC


#7

In reply to GM4COX:
Hi Jack
Yes there are some limitations, although I don’t look at it like that, I can have fun on the bands despite these ‘limitations’ and yes this encourages me to get my Full licence one day, but still it would be nice that in the mean time I can earn some chaser points (I allready did). I can imagine that on 40m ther’s always havy trafic, mostly people ignoring QRP frequencies and screaming there FULL POWER :wink:
I once tried to find out what the frequencies are in different european country’s where I’m allowed to work on, this is a study I’m stil working on, it’s different in every country.
In the Netherlands I’m alowed to work on 20m 14.000-14.250 MHz.
Patrick PD2PC


#8

In reply to PA3FYG:
Hey Hans
I will get my Full Licence some day, don’t worry, but even then I wont work with a radio that’s stuck on limited frequencies :wink: Oh and you don’t hear me complaining, I don’t see any limitation in the Novice Licence, or working QRP.
73’s PD2PC Patrick


#9

In reply to M0LEP:
DK is paradise for Novice, there you are allowed to work on almost any band with 100W. I don’t think this is an encouregment to get your Full licence !
I couldn’t find out, what the real difference in DK is between Novice and Full, I think it’s the Power and some ultra high frequencies.
What I still don’t understand is the difference in frequencie allocations even between the different country’s within Europe. EU ???
73 Patrick PD2PC always QRP


#10

Hi Jack, Rick, Andy and Hans
thanks for all your great reactions.
I hope I will get a chance to work you one day during SOTA activation.
And I promise you that you will be the first to know when I have my Full Licence.
This wil probably take some days, because now I’m building our new house. Thanks to wheather conditions at this moment, I have some time to study and for this aducational converstation.
73’s PD2PC Patrick


#11

In reply to M0LEP:

You will find that there are also frequency restrictions for the “novice” licences in Belgium

73’s Douglas ON4ROS


#12

In reply to ON4ROS:

You will find that there are also frequency restrictions for the
"novice" licences in Belgium

There are hardly any frequency restrictions for the “Foundation” licence in the UK. (60m is not allowed.) There is supposed to be a power limit of 10 watts, but it is not enforced. Therefore there is very little incentive to progress beyond the Foundation licence; many M3 stations have been on the air for more than ten years without attempting to upgrade!

73,
Walt (G3NYY)


#13

In reply to G3NYY:

M3 stations have been on the air for more than ten years without
attempting to upgrade!

There’s the added complication here that means folks may at present hold multiple calls…

73, Rick M0LEP


#14

In reply to G3NYY:

M3 stations have been on the air for more than ten years without
attempting to upgrade!

If the Foundation Licence (10 watts, operation only in UK etc) is sufficient for you, there should be no compulsion to upgrade. There may be good reasons for the time factor - for Foundation stations that do intend to upgrade.

For instance Jimmy was M3EYP for nearly 7 years, rejecting all intermediate courses because he was prioritising his school studies. I know some saw that as an ‘excuse’, but it was genuine! With A Levels out of the way, he did his Intermediate, and almost immediately enrolled on the Full, which he got 7 months later.

Any imposition of time limits for the licensing structure would have rendered such progress impossible.

I am sure that there are indeed some Foundation stations who exceed their 10w power limit. I am sure that most don’t.

I am also sure that there are Full stations that exceed their 400w power limit. I am sure that most don’t.

Tom M1EYP


#15

In reply to M1EYP:

Full stations that exceed their 400w power limit

We’re allowed to, we’ve passed the full exam! Even more so if you built the linear yourself! :slight_smile:

Andy
MM0FMF


#16

In reply to M1EYP:

Well said, Tom! I have a friend who has had his M3 for ten years and most definitely does not use more than ten watts (I’ve often been in his shack, so I know he has nothing capable of higher power!) He is quite happy with ten watts, and as you so often find with low-power ops, he is a skilful operator.

I often puzzle about the reported use of illegal high power - I mean, why? Run 800 watts and you have gained just 3 dB of signal strength, half an S-point. Is that really worth the expense and the power consumption, not to mention the risk, small though that may appear? Or is it the naughty thrill of breaking the law?

I do a lot of my HF operating with the FT 817. I get my share of contacts. The trick is to never mention that you are QRP! Say those magic letters and an S9 signal report often gets revised down to S7…

73

Brian G8ADD


#17

In reply to G8ADD:

I mean, why?

Because the people who do are most often graduates of the triple nickel where such antics are de rigeur. Technical understanding and comprehension are out the door and it’s just “I’ve got an IC7800 and big PA and I can bag more DX than you”. If 100W is good then 400W is better and 1500W is delightful.

Andy
MM0FMF


#18

In reply to MM0FMF:

You’ve lost me, Andy - I can’t see the connection between American firearms enthusiasts and illegal high power. Please elucidate?

73

Brian G8ADD


#19

In reply to G8ADD:

I was wondering what people that liked making timer circuits had to do with illegal high power, unless they need a TOT?

73,
Colin
M0XSD.


#20

In reply to M0XSD:

Its a very cold day, I think I’ll have a tot, too! :wink:

73

Brian G8ADD