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Correct pronunciation for “/“ sign in a callsign


#1

What is the correct or most widely accepted pronunciation of the slash or stroke sign on the air?

As in M/W6… is is Mike SLASH Whiskey 6 or Mike STROKE Whiskey 6?

Also I presume whatever it is in the example above its the same at the tail end with /P.

Paul M/W6PNG


#2

Being English - I vote for SLASH. Stroke can have other meanings that are better left off this discussion forum - hence SLASH is what I recommend you use.

For the portable SLASH-P or you can simply say Portable - so Mike SLASH Whiskey Six Papa November Golf Portable.

73 Ed.


#3

As is also the case with “SLASH”… :innocent:


#4

“Divided by”


#5

Ooops - right also … Hmm. I still think Slash is the best pronounciation of “/” in any case.


#6

I usually use “stroke” but I have often heard “slash” and occasionally “slant”, as far as I am concerned all are acceptable, why join the “NATO phonetics” crowd and try and put us in a strait jacket for pronunciations? :grinning:


#7

I’ve never heard anyone say slash on the air. Doesn’t mean it isn’t used just I’ve not heard it.

I always use ‘stroke’ and only for the first one when using reciprocal status. I’m in France so I am calling as F/M0FMF/P FOX STROKE MIKE ZERO FOX MIKE FOX PORTABLE. In Scotland I’d be MM0FMF/P MIKE MIKE ZERO FOX MIKE FOX PORTABLE.

That’s how I call and is a style I hear lots of others using. YMMV

Andy F/M0FMF/P
JN24


#8

What a lot of nonsense!

There is only one correct answer to this question.

“When transmitting in the visited country the licence holder must use his national call sign preceded by the call sign prefix of the visited country as indicated in ANNEX 2: and ANNEX 4:. The call sign prefix and the national call sign must be separated by the character “/” (telegraphy) or the word “stroke” (telephony).”

Source: CEPT T/R 61-01 paragraph 2.3 http://www.erodocdb.dk/Docs/doc98/official/pdf/TR6101.PDF

73,
Walt (G3NYY)


#9

Which is exactly what Andy said…


#10

Thanks for the Monday morning humor on strokes and slashes…

Stroke it is.

Paul M/W6PNG


#11

When I am out mobile or portable, I simple sign GOLF ZERO FOXTROT VICTOR HOTEL MOBILE OR PORTABLE, I never say slash or otherwise !!


#12

Ok agree with stroke.
In IT we talk from back-slash also logically the forward is the slash.
Bc I am from IT i use more the slash.
Erich


#13

Needless to say Wiki has an opinion.

The CEPT solution is fine and at least it doesn’t mandate having to define Forward or Backward Stroke as you need with IT systems.

Interestingly the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) document CAP413 does not specify a pronunciation for “/” . Since most things in aviation are defined this seems a little odd.

73 de

Andrew G4VFL


#14

I wonder if it is permissible to translate the word “stroke” if you are speaking in a language other than English.

In German, it is “strich”, in French it is “barre de fraction”, and in Russian it is “drob”. I have heard all these used quite frequently.
:slight_smile:

73, Walt (G3NYY)


#15

I’ve heard HFers using the word “portable” for this - ISTR a Caribbean holiday station using (for instance) Foxtrot Mike portable Delta Lima … portable Mobile. Not advisable for SOTA (Mike One Echo Yankee Pappa portable Portable).


#16

Yes in Germany they use a lot “Strich” … but only Strich is not totally correc - what kind of Strich ? If, then should be “Schrägstrich” for Slash and “Rückwärts Schrägstrich” or “Schrägstrich zurück” for back-slash… but these words are too long.
Good, I work most in CW - we don’t have the problem.


#17

In the German DARC radio show they call it “Schräger” which sound very strange to me but I have no idea about the origin of that shortcut.


#18

What the Germans say in Germany or the British in the UK is fine for domestic consumption. The only place anything is specified is for CEPT.
It’s so much easier on CW “- . . - .” for all languages :slight_smile:


#19

IMHO Schräger is used by IT programmers


#20

Ah yes I have heard people use “slant” as well, my initial reaction was “WHAT”??? What did he say, what did he mean? So I wouldn’t use slant.

Ed.